Sun
Apr 19 2020
06:25 am
By: R. Neal
Topics:
jbr's picture

Patients compensate for the

Patients compensate for the low oxygen in their blood by breathing faster and deeper — and this happens without their realizing it. This silent hypoxia, and the patient’s physiological response to it, causes even more inflammation and more air sacs to collapse, and the pneumonia worsens until oxygen levels plummet. In effect, patients are injuring their own lungs by breathing harder and harder. Twenty percent of Covid pneumonia patients then go on to a second and deadlier phase of lung injury. Fluid builds up and the lungs become stiff, carbon dioxide rises, and patients develop acute respiratory failure.

The Infection That’s Silently Killing Coronavirus Patients

jbr's picture

Amazon using thermal cameras for coronavirus temperature check

Amazon has started using thermal cameras at its operations facilities to screen workers for fevers, a common symptom of the novel coronavirus.

Amazon is using thermal cameras for coronavirus temperature checks

fischbobber's picture

Blood oxygen tests

If I remember correctly, blood oxygen testers are cheap and easy to use. They are also a much better indicator of covid-19. It seems to more of a blood disease than a lung disease, messing up the transfer of oxygen to the blood cells. Am I missing something?

jbr's picture

I may be wrong, but my

I may be wrong, but my understanding is most if not all people with covid have a fever. It is a common symptom that shows up early. Sometimes covid pneumonia develops and then oxygen deprivation comes into play as a characteristic.

From the article reference above ...

Normal oxygen saturation for most persons at sea level is 94 percent to 100 percent; Covid pneumonia patients I saw had oxygen saturations as low as 50 percent.

My understanding is oxygen saturation below 90 percent needs to be addressed.

fischbobber's picture

Exactly.

It ends in the blood, not the lungs. From what I understand.

jbr's picture

Covid-19 causes sudden strokes in young adults, doctors say

The new coronavirus appears to be causing sudden strokes in adults in their 30s and 40s who are not otherwise terribly ill, doctors reported Wednesday.

Covid-19 causes sudden strokes in young adults, doctors say

jbr's picture

Seniors with Covid-19 show unusual symptoms, doctors say

Covid-19 is typically signaled by three symptoms: a fever, an insistent cough and shortness of breath. But older adults — the age group most at risk of severe complications or death from this condition ― may have none of these characteristics.

Seniors with Covid-19 show unusual symptoms, doctors say

jbr's picture

See how far spit droplets travel through air when we talk

The CDC recommends that all Americans wear face coverings in public.

See how far spit droplets travel through air when we talk

bizgrrl's picture

Antilockdown protester in

Antilockdown protester in Tennessee carries poster that says,

"Sacrifice the Weak, Re-Open TN"

We're so proud. /snark

jbr's picture

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan plans to crack down on grocery stores

I don't know about local grocery testing, but the last time I was in Publix next to campus it looked like every employee had on a mask. I don't think that is the case at Kroger and others.

He said that by Monday, May 11, every grocery store in the city should be able to demonstrate that every single employee has a recent negative COVID-19 test.

Duggan said that if grocery store employees do not get tested, the city will take appropriate legal action.

City of Detroit planning to crack down on COVID-19 testing for grocery store employees

bizgrrl's picture

At the Food City I shopped at

At the Food City I shopped at recently only one employee out of about ten had a mask.

Mike Knapp's picture

Target was 50/50 of employees masked

~25% of customers but they were also rocking the clean carts like they have been at Krogers

jbr's picture

60 Minutes - computer algorithm among the first to detect virus

On New Year's Eve, a small company in Canada was among the first to raise the alarm about an infectious disease outbreak. Its computer algorithm calculated where the virus might spread next. The technology could change the way we fight another contagion.

The computer algorithm that was among the first to detect the coronavirus outbreak

jbr's picture

Non-covid19 deaths spike in March and April

Deaths across America spiked as Covid-19 began its spread, and many were never attributed to the new coronavirus, researchers reported Monday.

Patients already weakened by pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease may have had a death listed as being due to one of those causes, rather than coronavirus.

Deaths spiked as Covid-19 spread in March and April, new analysis finds

jbr's picture

Companies look at legal liability for coronavirus infections

As companies start planning their reopenings, business groups are pushing Congress to limit liability from potential lawsuits filed by workers and customers infected by the coronavirus.

Companies look to limit legal liability for coronavirus infections

jbr's picture

Costco to require face coverings for shoppers

jbr's picture

Texas Zoo is opening back up with a drive-thru experience

The San Antonio Zoo announced it is giving families the opportunity pack up their cars and drive-thru the park for a limited amount of time.

A Texas Zoo is opening back up to the public with a drive-thru experience

jbr's picture

Deaths soar in country that didn't lock down

Unlike its European neighbors, Swedish officials did not institute lock down measures to combat the Covid-19 epidemic.

Deaths soar in country that didn't lock down. Officials identify big reason why.

fischbobber's picture

Martin and Glenn

The Swedish Protocol is essentially what was instituted in Knox County after a propaganda campaign, full of lies and damn lies by Martin Daniel over The weekend. We got a little less disciplined version though. Stay tuned. We have every reason to believe death will follow.

Daniels cut me off from his facebook account when I noted that causing the willful death of another human was murder and pointing out the his legislative immunity from prosecution would be over after he fails to run for re-election. I'm not sure about the nuts and bolts of his, or Jacobs immunity from prosecution (I presume it would be something along a massive drunk driving killing spree) , buy I'm pretty sure that was the area of comment that lead to my exit.

fischbobber's picture

Death rates

Sweden's death rate is 12% and appears to be growing. So much for Daniels statistical insignificance.

fischbobber's picture

Sweden's death rate

Sweden's death rate has been slowly, steadily rising over the course of the last few days. It is now at 12.34%.

jbr's picture

Rangers advise caution amid reopenings

In mid-March, many of America’s national parks shut down to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Wildlife quickly moved into the spaces now lacking the traffic jams and noisy hikers that have become a staple of parks across the country. Bears are grazing in meadows near California’s Yosemite Valley Visitor Center, and elk were undisturbed at the beginning of the spring calving season in Yellowstone National Park. After 327 million visitors to national parks in 2019, the shutdowns have given the park ecologies a moment to breathe.

National park closings gave wildlife room to roam. Rangers advise caution amid reopenings.

jbr's picture

Siberian zoo sees animal baby boom during lockdown

A Siberian zoo that closed its doors to visitors for over two months due to the coronavirus says the lockdown has encouraged a baby boom among its animals.

Among the zoo's new arrivals are rare Egyptian goslings, reindeer calves, llama crias and a baby brown weeper capuchin monkey.

Siberian zoo sees animal baby boom during lockdown

jbr's picture

Most dangerous place in the grocery store

Eric Feigl-Ding, an epidemiologist and health economist at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health, said cashiers "need N95 masks as much as health care workers." He believes that all stores also need to give their cashiers face shields because many coronavirus carriers are asymptomatic. In China, stores are sanitizing cash, and the United States "should as well at some point."

This is the most dangerous place in the grocery store

jbr's picture

Wearing masks, South Korean students to go back to school

Widespread testing, intensive contact tracing and tracking apps have enabled South Korea to limit the spread of the virus without the extensive lockdowns seen in other countries.

After suffering the first major coronavirus outbreak outside China, South Korea has succeeded in lowering the daily rate of infections to around 10 or less, mostly imported.

Wearing masks, South Korean students to go back to school

bizgrrl's picture

What's wrong with these

What's wrong with these people? Oh, wait, they're just using the president's guidance.

You missed the one where some guy in Texas pushed a Texas park ranger into a body of water. The guy was caught and arrested.

jbr's picture

The psychology behind why some people won't wear masks

Aronoff compared the mask guidance to the ban on smoking cigarettes in restaurants or schools.

"There are rules about not smoking in enclosed restaurants and bars because that smoke can be deleterious to someone else's health," he said. "Now we're in a situation where, if I'm infected with the Covid-19 virus, my breath can be lethal to someone else."

The psychology behind why some people won't wear masks

jbr's picture

Mask incident in Alabama

jbr's picture

Man refusing to wear mask breaks arm of Target employee

Two men were arrested for felony battery after starting a fight with employees at a Los Angeles Target store over wearing masks inside the store.

Man refusing to wear mask breaks arm of Target employee

jbr's picture

Video shows Costco worker calmly handle customer berating him

"Sir, have a great day. You are no longer welcome here in our warehouse," the worker responds. "You need to leave. Thank you very much."

Video shows Costco worker calmly handle customer berating him over mask policy

jbr's picture

Masks seem to be working to fight the virus

Americans are at odds over whether it's necessary to keep taking coronavirus protective measures, but a leading researcher says the data is clear: The path ahead in the Covid-19 pandemic is being shaped by masks.

"We now have really clear evidence that wearing masks works -- it's probably a 50% protection against transmission," Dr. Chris Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, or IHME, at the University of Washington, told CNN late Tuesday.

Masks seem to be working to fight the virus, even as some refuse them and US deaths near 100,000

Moon's picture

IHME

It would seem to me that it is not unwise to question IHME's credibility in these matters. And given the group's previous data tomfoolery, one wonders how they were ever again accepted as experts at anything.

fischbobber's picture

Or

You could look at the results being achieved in countries mandating masks, Austria, Japan, etc.

Moon's picture

"...look at results being achieved..." elsewhere

You could look at the results being achieved in countries mandating masks, Austria, Japan, etc.

I agree. Thus far, the "look around and see what is actually happening" method of modeling/forecasting seems much more useful than anything that has come out of academia.

fischbobber's picture

In fairness to academia....

They are being asked to give us years worth of answers in days. The questions government should be asking are "What non-specific techniques could be used to slow and control the spread of this?"

Instead, our leaders are trying to get through this by election day, which, ironically, is the best way to extend the virus' run.

We don't even know what all this disease does yet. And the more we find out the worse/more bizarre it gets.

AC's picture

Please. "Academia" does not

Please. "Academia" does not speak with a single voice - it is comprised of people and methodologies, some better than others. Academic methods and scientific methods involve continual debate and revisions and modifications as new information and data becomes available. It's a bit ironic that you would cite a scientific (and academic) publication such as the Lancet to support your case and then take a swipe at "academia." This comment comes across as another example of the Beavis and Butthead tribalism that damages thoughtful discourse. What's even sadder is when showing concern and respect for others - in this case, being willing to take precautions to protect the health of others - is regarded as a threat to one's manhood and sense of independence. That's weak.

Moon's picture

You're correct, Ashley

You are right, Ashley. I will be more specific.

There are (at least) two groups whose C-19 models, forecasts and predictions have been so horribly wrong that their good reputations do not deserve unquestioned restoration:

1. The University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, and
2. The Coronavirus-19 Outbreak Response Experts (CORE-19) group at UT's Baker Center.

While it is unfair to paint "academia" with the same dirty monolithic brush, there is a macro flaw in the way we are using academic research as it related to C-19. As pointed out by a fishbobber, academicians are not typically asked to immediately produce models that will be immediately used for massive public policy decisions within hours of the completion of their work. Academic research typically has the luxury of publication and years of peer challenges and attempts at replication - all of which typically occurs outside of general public view.

This is a rare instance of certain academicians' work being immediately used on an unprecedented scale. And quite tragically, the vast majority of public decision-makers chose the wrong academic models on which to base their decisions.

Mike Knapp's picture

IHME's work as an ostensible policy basis was a massive failure

And quite tragically, the vast majority of public decision-makers chose the wrong academic models on which to base their decisions.

There's the model array and there's the selection of which ones. That the key decision makers in question chose a particular model which just happened to be one of the most optimistic and vastly divergent from agent-based and SEIR epi models is suspect to say the least. It's important in this regard to note that, generally speaking one side of the epistemic divide goes with science and reality - and its policy decision makers generally go along with that side - the other side doesn't. So when we talk about how the selection of models and science goes, it's important to keep in mind that one side does inquiry, is reality-based, the other side - which currently occupies a lot of powerful positions including the POTUS - doesn't or worse apes science with its own version of science even though that version is not. This is imv in large part how we end up with IHME models being the fulcrum for incredibly important public health policies at the federal level. Because the selection criteria is more about whether the models in this case buttress identity and priors rather than being scientifically valid. The merchants of doubt hold more sway in one political realm than the other. This is how some deny climate, deny lung cancer, empower fossil fuels through sham science.

“the party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final most essential command.”

Carl Bergstrom, biology professor at UW, has been particularly good on this and has a book with the aptly titled "Calling Bullshit" coming out in August.

Calling Bullshit

AC's picture

Perhaps, David. From my

Perhaps, David. From my perspective, there have been numerous shortcomings and flaws in addressing the pandemic - reaching far beyond the realm of academia. In some instances, especially where caution is being urged, I'm inclined to give some benefit of the doubt given the nature of the rapidly changing circumstances and evolution in understanding of this disease. However when flaws in a projection model are used to undermine the message that wearing masks in public situations is a smart practice that could reduce the spread of the virus and save lives, I have to disagree.

fischbobber's picture

Not to pile on

It appears, that through modeling, or even her gut decision base on the plethora of data she was being asked to process, Mayor Kincannon made the right decisions to slow the spread. It's just as clear that Jacobs royally screwed up the reopen. Had it not been for the protests allowing him and out in a couple weeks, the mess that will become this town would be totally on his shoulders.

Had Jacobs advocated for masks to his warrior tribe, we might have still been able to handle whatever Covid-19 brought us this spring and summer.. After this weekend's demonstrations though, Jacobs will be able to deny culpability though and move the public official culpability to some nebulous forces that don't exist. He won't have to be accountable for the liuves he cost this town.

Right now, maybe we'll be able to handle our first wave, maybe we won't. Planning, we don't need no stinking planning. All we have to do is shut the smart woman up. /snark

jbr's picture

Best way to reduce coronavirus transmission by wearing a mask

A team of researchers in Texas and California compared Covid-19 infection rate trends in Italy and New York both before and after face masks were made mandatory. Both locations started to see infection rates flatten only after mandatory face mask measures were put in place, according to the study published Thursday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Best way to reduce coronavirus transmission is by wearing a face mask, study finds

fischbobber's picture

Thank you.

Being a misanthrope is a thankless task.

Moon's picture

States requiring masks

The article lists 13 states requiring masks in public. Here are those 13 states, sorted by the percentage of residents hospitalized (at any time) for C-19. Mortality stats are also included, along with those figures for the entire US and Tennessee.

preview_Screenshot 2020-06-20 at 12.06.34 PM_0.png

fischbobber's picture

These are total population numbers.

At this point (we're still very early in the onset of the disease) the pertinent numbers are Rfactor ( rate of transmission), hospitalization percentage and death percentage per rate of infection.

We already know the vast majority of Americans do not have Covid yet.

Once this disease has run its course, these categories will be great for comparison at a historical perspective. But let's look at Tennessee. In a month, those two numbers will be .068% and .032%. Without a translation of mortuary and hospital bed capacity into a percentage of population, the numbers are meaningless.

If you want to measure in terms of percentage of total population, then all the measurements must be translated into that measurement. For instance, that US number of hospitalizations is 229,740 and rising. We know that outbreaks move and overwhelm hospitals in areas it hits. Yet the .07 would suggest the number is insignificant. We know from the outbreaks that it is not the case. It's the same number, but the anti-maskers are swapping various views of that number and comparing apples to oranges. It's the same way people get sold time-share. What's good in the time share industry is not necessarily good public policy.

What we do know is that masks work. Covid is spread by spit and masks stop spit. It really is as simple as that. Community wide use of masks slows the spread of the virus to a degree greater than herd immunity would. The use of masks can either be a community effort based on an educated populace banding together in a common cause, it can be government mandated, or it can be ignored, like the anti-maskers wishing to infect as many as possible (the Swedish protocol) thus increasing deaths, permanent disability, financial ruin for the patients and ultimately the collapse of local governments and economies, because that's what instability does to markets. Glenn Jacobs and Martin Daniels are both on record as supporting the Swedish protocol. Glenn Jacobs and Martin Daniels are both idiots and attempted murderers at this point. If their plan works, they should be held accountable and tried for murder.

Interestingly, local anecdotal evidence suggests that, with mask use and common sense distancing, we can begin to build new normals. If we could get community use of masks normalized, we can not only get football season, we can jump the rest of the SEC and dominate for literally decades. Don't think for a second that recruits aren't paying attention to Knoxville's Covid numbers, or how we are handling the BLM changes that will be coming. After the Klan rally at Clemson, rumor has it that UT has become somewhat a destination point for recruits. The irony of the situation where the same people that claim to want a dominate football team are leading the way to destroy that very effort.

That's what happens when you elect a do-nothing libertarian wrestler who knows jack about football or government or even basic science to run your county. Elections have consequences.

Moon's picture

At least with respect to football recruits

Don't think for a second that recruits aren't paying attention to Knoxville's Covid numbers

Uh ... swing and a miss, there.

fischbobber's picture

Think so?

Look at the UT players at the BLM rally. Look at Bama's Covid situation. Look at the tweets coming out of Clemson from their players. Look at our recruiting before and since covid became an issue. You're out of touch with the kids dude. What we do and don't do as a community in dealing with covid and race relations will determine our success as a football team. And Pruitt is every bit the positive community leader that Jacobs is the incompetent fool.

Moon's picture

Yeah, I’m pretty sure

At least based on the comments of the several current, past and future UT football players at my house right now- yeah, I’m pretty confident in my comment that recruits are not monitoring Covid case counts in Knoxville. (All of them are paying for their own food, just to be clear.)

(Sorry; I couldn’t pass that one up.)

R. Neal's picture

Well, young, strong healthy

Well, young, strong healthy people apparently aren't dying from covid, so the odds are in their favor. About their meemaws, though...

Moon's picture

Re Meemaw and football recruits

R Neal wrote: Well, young, strong healthy people apparently aren't dying from covid, so the odds are in their favor. About their meemaws, though...

You are obviously quite right, Neal. My comment was in response to the silly claim that oversized 16- and 17- year-old high school students are monitoring Knoxville's C-19 cases as a part of their recruiting process.

Back to players infecting Meemaw ... The "Meemaws" who are currently at risk are adult coaches, trainers and equipment personnel working closely with players in football complexes around the country. Granny is safe from her oversized grandson because players won't return home until December.

In many ways, the players are better off having returned to campus. They have structure, medical staff in the complex and they can't infect at-risk family members.

fischbobber's picture

Better off

They are better off as long as our community spread of covid stays at a low rate. If an outbreak occurs, like Mayor Glenn Jacobs, Representative Martin Daniel and their merry band of idiot followers are trying to make happen, the best thing for the players is to send them home to shelter in place and hope for next year.

Being ahead of the covid situation and being at the forefront of the BLM situation are the biggest sociological breaks our town has given the football team since Doug Dickey and integration. Just because our local politicians are too stupid to see it, and the subsequent problems a large outbreak will bring to our ball team doesn't not make it so.

As to the staff, masks work. If they are not proceeding in a manner to procure and institute proper mask and distancing techniques, then any in team spread is on them. We know yelling, screaming and singing send out more spit. Wear a mask and use a bullhorn.

Maybe you're right. Maybe none of the players are not aware of the disease, how it spreads through communities, and how easily it's carried how to their mothers and grandparents. Maybe they don't know that the long term effects of having and recovering from this disease, for people in their age group, will be the loss of enough of their God-given talent ( their 4.3 speed goes to 5.1, no big deal, right? ) and weight loss and chronic fatigue, but they're coming to college, and no matter how stupid and out of touch our recruits are, as you claim them to be, they will quickly find out that the SMART adults in charge are taking this seriously. But hey, they're not paying attention. Be right and chuckle it up. The 30-40% of the players that show no symptoms beyond a slower forty time should be more than enough to get us through the season.

Mike Knapp's picture

Why do HC workers wear N95 masks?

or face shields?

R. Neal's picture

They don't, unless they are

They don't, unless they are working directly with covid patients.

Mike Knapp's picture

Yes, but why?

Yes, but why?

R. Neal's picture

Obvious reasons when working

Obvious reasons when working with covid patients. Or was that a rhetorical question? :)

P.S. All other staff, visitors, etc. wear surgical masks at all times, and nurses wear gloves that they change between patients.

Mike Knapp's picture

The PS

was where I was. All PT’s and patients at my wife’s PT clinic wear nonclinical masks, sister says no one allowed into UTMC without such a mask. Now back to mediating a discussion between my 10 & 12 yo about whether juicy fruit is better than big red with a side of whether call of duty is rly just the same game released every year with minor modifications...

R. Neal's picture

sister says no one allowed

sister says no one allowed into UTMC without such a mask.

They also screen all visitors by taking temp and asking questions about symptoms, contacts, travel, etc. They also only allow one visitor at a time and require check-in and check-out at the screening stations. In ICU, covid patients are isolated in a separate part of the floor. In the ER, patients with symptoms or suspected exposure have big red warning signs on the door about ppe, gloves in a tray on the door, and only staff allowed and they were wearing masks, shields, and those disposable coveralls and booties.

In other words, they are taking this stuff seriously and are amazing. Nobody whines or complains except the occasional uninformed visitor bozo at check-in.

fischbobber's picture

Masks work.

Modern right wing politics is an incomprehensible mumbo-jumbo of semantics, anymore. One poorly designed flawed study or opinion should invalidate hundreds of years worth of science. The current right wing argument against masks goes along these lines, "Because I have evidence that masks may not be 100% effective, I should ignore the mountains of evidence showing that masks control the spread of covid more effectively than any other technique."

The justification? "My ignorance is equal to your knowledge because the constitution says so."

Factchecker's picture

Wuuut?

That percentage listing for states is completely wackadoodle (to use a word a right-wing friend likes to use). It doesn't show anything about infections and deaths over time, nor does it address population densities and many other data that health and science professionals need in order to really know anything. Whether masks help or not is one such metric that matters.

It also shows low percentages that trivialize the number of souls lost (over 117,000 in less than a third of a year--or about double the number of U.S. military who died in Vietnam over about 20 years).

It looks like that was pieced together by a low-level GOP operative, to perpetuate the pandemic in this country in order to extend the power of malevolent and corrupt Republicans.

jbr's picture

KAT driver threatened with box cutter over mask

The driver told officers the man became irate and threatened her with a box cutter after she asked him to put on a face mask to board the bus.

Man threatens KAT bus driver with box cutter after she asked him to put on a mask

BoB W.'s picture

unity

Had to go to the Dr. last FRI & as we left, the parking attendant - an older lady - wasn't wearing a mask. We asked her if she had any. "No" she replied, so we gave her a baggie that had 6 to 8 masks. She cried. God bless her.

Our neighbor has had a part of both of her lungs removed due to cancer. She had no masks. We gave her some N95 masks that I already had a number of before the pandemic, for use in my shop when sanding, grinding, painting, etc.. We also bought masks, gloves & toilet paper for my niece & my wife's brother.

If it is possible, we should be helping friends, family, neighbors, and YES - strangers. There is strength in unity & as they say, what goes around, comes around.

Furthermore - "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy self"
Words to live by.

fischbobber's picture

Masks at Weigels

10 packs for $14.99. They're high, but available.

bizgrrl's picture

What kind of masks? Which

What kind of masks? Which Weigels?

fischbobber's picture

Weigels at Callahan.

They were disposable surgical/paper fiber masks.

jbr's picture

See how a mask affects how a cough travels

BoB W.'s picture

HI $ masks

Today at a local convenience store in Rockford, TN (Four Corners Market) they had masks at the check out counter for $2 each. OUCH!

jbr's picture

~20,000 teens in Georgia have received their driver license ...

... without a road test

All of them got their licenses without taking an official road test. It's Georgia's way of handling the backlog of the thousands of road test requests that have been put on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Nearly 20,000 teens in Georgia have received their driver licenses without a road test

jbr's picture

Customers shoot 2 OKC McDonald's employees

Police told KOCO 5 that two people entered the lobby of the McDonald's near Southwest 89th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, where employees informed them that the dining room was closed because of safety precautions surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. At some point, a gun was produced and two male employees were shot, police said.

Customers shoot 2 OKC McDonald's employees after being told dining room was closed, police say

jbr's picture

Most coronavirus in some states are in prisons and nursing homes

In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state's coronavirus deaths are nursing home residents. In New Hampshire, long-term care facility residents make up nearly 80% of the state's cases.

The most alarming coronavirus numbers in some states are in prisons and nursing homes

jbr's picture

Silent hypoxia: Covid-19 patients who should be gasping for air

Typically, these patients have experienced some Covid-19 symptoms for two to seven days before they show up at the hospital complaining of sudden chest tightness or an inability to breathe deeply, said Dr. Richard Levitan, who's been an emergency room physician for some 30 years.

Silent hypoxia: Covid-19 patients who should be gasping for air but aren't

jbr's picture

'quarantine greenhouses' so diners can eat while social distanci

Mediamatic ETEN, a restaurant in Amsterdam, is offering a four-course vegetarian menu for diners -- served to guests while they sit in their own personal quarantine greenhouses.

Waiters wear gloves and face shields to alleviate any risk of infections, the restaurant confirmed to CNN. They also use long boards to bring dishes into the greenhouses to diners.

This restaurant in Amsterdam introduced 'quarantine greenhouses' so diners can eat while social distancing

jbr's picture

Shortage of needles, syringes looms in race to develop COVID-19

Currently, the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) contains about 15 million needles and syringes, about 2% of what will be needed, according to Bright’s complaint.

Shortage of needles, syringes looms in race to develop COVID-19 vaccine

Supply chain headache? Hundreds of millions of syringes will be needed to vaccinate U.S.

fischbobber's picture

Some thoughts to consider

(link...)

Got it? Good. Read it, know it, live it.

jbr's picture

Went to restaurant in

Went to restaurant in Kingston Pike/Cedar Bluff area Sunday evening. None of kitchen staff nor some other staff preparing or handling food had masks. We got up and left. Is it a requirement for them to wear a mask?

R. Neal's picture

Following are the guidelines

Following are the guidelines from KCHD. Hard to tell the answer to your question, but it looks like the answer is no. Maybe KCHD can answer if you call them?

• When 6 feet of physical distancing cannot be
maintained, employees and patrons must wear
face coverings.
• Sanitize surfaces and items between users.
• Treat every patron and employee as if they are
potentially infectious.
• Drinking-only establishments are not open for
onsite consumption in Phase One.
• Food truck parks are not open in Phase One.
• Curbside pickup and delivery options should still
be offered, when possible.
• Restaurants can open only with tables spaced to
allow for at least 6 feet of physical distancing
between groups of patrons, at a maximum of 50%
capacity based on seating capacity. Physical
distancing of table spacing applies to both indoor
and outdoor seating.
• A maximum of 6 people per table, with the
understanding that restaurants have more than
10 total patrons at one time, face coverings
cannot be worn while eating, and physical
distancing is intermittently broken during the
delivery of food items from the kitchen.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet must be
maintained in both the kitchen and dining room.
Diners cannot wait inside or congregate while
waiting.
• The bar/counter section within a restaurant is not
open for seating or standing due to the tendency
to congregate and because of the danger of
respiratory droplets landing on the service area.
Alcohol can be served from the bar in other
seated areas of the establishment.
• Self-service is not permitted (for example, salad
bars, buffets, beverage service and shared
condiments) due to the use of communal serving
instruments and surfaces.
• Condiments must be single-serve, provided by
request only (not tabletop) and cannot be reused.
• Menu boards, single use menus or sanitizing of
menus between each use is required.
• Use rolled silverware/napkins stored in sealed
bins (cloth face covering and gloves should be
worn by staff while rolling silverware in a
designated sanitary area)
• No live music.

Factchecker's picture

Risks and how to avoid them, found via Kevin Drum

Apologies if this is posted elsewhere here on this or another thread, but this looks like good data we all can use.

(link...)

Mike Knapp's picture

What’s going on at city County building? Wearing masks also?

Via Yamiche Alcindor - CONFIRMED: The White House has directed all West Wing staff to wear masks at all times in the building, except when they are at their own desks.

jbr's picture

Disney parks in US will 'likely' require face masks

It will be interesting to see what they can come up with that will allow for them to reopen.

The CEO of the Walt Disney Company said this week that face masks for guests and workers will "likely" be one of the coronavirus precautions put in place when the company's U.S. parks reopen.

Disney parks in US will 'likely' require face masks when they reopen, CEO says

jmcnair's picture

That thieving rat!

With the prices they charge for admission, they should supply branded masks to each visitor with a happy Mickey/Minnie or Goofy face on it.

bizgrrl's picture

Excellent!

Excellent!

jbr's picture

Inmates tried to infect themselves with the coronavirus

The Los Angeles County jail inmates had one goal in mind: get infected with the novel coronavirus so they could be released from custody. And they were going to do it together.

Inmates tried to infect themselves with the coronavirus to get early release, Los Angeles County sheriff says

jbr's picture

Uber to use facial recognition tech to determine if masks worn

Uber drivers will have to take a selfie with their mask on and submit it within the app for verification before they can begin a ride.

The Uber app already uses face-scanning technology to verify a driver’s ID before starting a ride, so this new mask verification is built off that framework.

Uber to use facial recognition tech to determine if drivers are wearing masks

jbr's picture

How Uber rides are about to change

In a blog post on Wednesday, Khosrowshahi said the new Covid-19 changes will be in effect through the end of June, and then will be revisited based on local conditions.

Face masks and mandatory selfies for drivers: How Uber rides are about to change

jbr's picture

Environments with increased risk of spreading coronavirus

...which environments have an increased risk of spreading coronavirus

Biologist: Avoid these places to protect against Covid-19

jbr's picture

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: BlueCross covering online

Marking a seismic shift in medicine, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee is fully embracing telehealth, announcing Thursday that from now it will cover online medical consultations with in-network health care providers.

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: BlueCross commits to covering online medical consults from now on

jbr's picture

Humans are not herds

Ryan said the term "herd immunity" emerged from veterinary epidemiology, typically involving business decisions of whether to let animals die for the overall health of a herd.

"An individual animal in that sense doesn't matter, from the perspective of the brutal economics of that decision-making," Ryan said.

Can herd immunity help stop the coronavirus? Experts warn it's not that easy.

bizgrrl's picture

May 17, 2020, Texas reports

May 17, 2020, Texas reports largest single-day jump in coronavirus cases.

Texas reported 1,801 new coronavirus cases Saturday, reportedly marking the state’s largest single-day jump since the start of the coronavirus crisis.

The Texas Department of State Health Services said 734 of the new cases are from Potter and Randall counties.

“These counties’ new cases are largely from targeted testing of employees at meat plants in the area. More test results from plants are expected,” it tweeted.

Midori Barstow's picture

US lockdown protests may have

US lockdown protests may have spread virus widely, cellphone data suggests

Devices associated with protesters travelled up to hundreds of miles after rallies where few precautions were taken

(link...)

jbr's picture

He thought the coronavirus was 'a fake crisis.'

A Florida man who thought the coronavirus was "a fake crisis" has changed his mind after he and his wife contracted COVID-19.

He thought the coronavirus was 'a fake crisis.' Then he contracted it and changed his mind.

jbr's picture

A spike of on May 18 of new

Mike Knapp's picture

Kai Kupferschmidt in Science

Kai Kupferschmidt in Science Mag - Why do some COVID-19 patients infect many others, whereas most don’t spread the virus at all?

That’s why in addition to R, scientists use a value called the dispersion factor (k), which describes how much a disease clusters. The lower k is, the more transmission comes from a small number of people. In a seminal 2005 Nature paper, Lloyd-Smith and co-authors estimated that SARS—in which superspreading played a major role—had a k of 0.16. The estimated k for MERS, which emerged in 2012, is about 0.25. In the flu pandemic of 1918, in contrast, the value was about one, indicating that clusters played less of a role.

Estimates of k for SARS-CoV-2 vary. In January, Julien Riou and Christian Althaus at the University of Bern simulated the epidemic in China for different combinations of R and k and compared the outcomes with what had actually taken place. They concluded that k for COVID-19 is somewhat higher than for SARS and MERS. That seems about right, says Gabriel Leung, a modeler at the University of Hong Kong. “I don’t think this is quite like SARS or MERS, where we observed very large superspreading clusters,” Leung says. “But we are certainly seeing a lot of concentrated clusters where a small proportion of people are responsible for a large proportion of infections.” But in a recent preprint, Adam Kucharski of LSHTM estimated that k for COVID-19 is as low as 0.1. “Probably about 10% of cases lead to 80% of the spread,” Kucharski says.

Treehouse's picture

Today on NPR

Yes, I heard a small number of people can infect a huge number of people. Such as a grocery store worker and what does this mean for a waiter in a restaurant. And in case you hadn't heard, Calhouns sucks.

Mike Knapp's picture

What’s up with Calhouns?

*

Treehouse's picture

From Facebook

And there was another from Chesapeake's that I can't find right now.

Diandra Heck
Yesterday at 11:01 AM ·
I have worked for Calhoun's for 7 years. And yesterday I got fired because I refused to break the phase one guidelines of serving customers at the bar. It was either do what they say or I don't have a job there. So instead of breaking the guidelines, I had no other choice but to leave. These guidelines were set for the safety of our workers. Copper Cellar restaurants do not care about that at all. They are willing to terminate workers like myself in order to follow their OWN guidelines that was given to them by the owner of the company. Here I have a photo of the bar last night. Today they moved all the chairs because they are expecting the health department to show up and they don't want to get caught for breaking the guidelines. Its funny... I spent 7 years with this company and they let me go for not breaking the law and for standing up for the safety of my health and my families health. I left in a respectful manner, I did not cause a scene like they are telling everyone there, that is a lie. I left with my head held high, and the fact that I knew I did not do anything wrong. please share this post and get the word out because this is wrong

R. Neal's picture

Compass has a report.

Compass has a report. Complaints posted on facebook by an employee at the Turkey Creek Calhouns and a manager at Calhouns on the river. They say the restaurants aren't complying with distancing and other guidelines. The health dept. said compliance is voluntary and there is no enforcement, and suggested people just avoid places that aren't complying. Copper Cellar/Calhouns declined to comment.

Compass: (link...)

jbr's picture

I dont know all the places

I dont know all the places owned by the folks that own Calhoun's.

Walking around downtown it looked like the restaurants were spacing people and employees wearing masks. If I go in a restaurant and the employees aren't wearing masks, I leave.
It looked like the Stock and Barrel had folks crammed too close together in the outside seating area.

It surprises me how few people wear masks downtown, and in general. At least it seems you should have one to put on when you go inside. I saw a pregnant woman walking downtown without a mask. That seems like a questionable decision.

jbr's picture

This is how sharing dinner table items can make you sick

Closer look at how quickly germs can spread in restaurants through a science experiment designed to track germ droplets.

This is how sharing dinner table items can make you sick

jbr's picture

CDC Opening America Up Again

jbr's picture

Sweden is still nowhere near 'herd immunity'

Sweden has revealed that despite adopting more relaxed measures to control coronavirus, only 7.3% of people in Stockholm had developed the antibodies needed to fight the disease by late April.

well below the 70-90% needed to create "herd immunity" in a population.

Sweden has now had 32,172 cases and 3,871 deaths, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University.

Sweden is still nowhere near 'herd immunity,' even though it didn't go into lockdown

jbr's picture

Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count

Trousdale County in Tennessee by far has the most in the list "Hot spots: Counties with the highest number of cases per resident" in the entire US, as of May 21.

Lake County has the 5th most, Bledsoe County the 8th most.

Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count

barker's picture

One Word:

Prisons.

fischbobber's picture

Any word?

From Morgan County.

barker's picture

TDOC has been doing

TDOC has been doing comprehensive testing of its prisons, but I don't know the schedule off the top of my head. As of Tuesday, Morgan County had only seven active cases. That tells me the correctional facility tests haven't come back yet.

fischbobber's picture

Thanks.

That's what I thought.

jbr's picture

Hair stylist worked while symptomatic, exposed dozens

A hair stylist in Springfield, Missouri, exposed as many as 91 people to coronavirus after working at a salon for eight days while symptomatic, health officials said Friday.

He warned residents who recently visited the same locations as the stylist, including a Dairy Queen, a Walmart and a CVS pharmacy, to look for COVID-19 symptoms and isolate themselves if they develop.

Missouri hair stylist with coronavirus worked while symptomatic, exposed dozens of clients

jbr's picture

COVID-19 is costing drug cartels millions of dollars

Bodner said California’s stay-at-home order has made it more difficult for traffickers to launder money and move around the city unseen.

“When there’s less hay in the haystack, it’s easier to find the needle,” he added. “It’s caused the drug cartels and money launderers to take more risks, and that’s where we can capitalize.”

COVID-19 is costing drug cartels millions of dollars

jbr's picture

Virginia requires everyone to wear masks in public spaces

Everyone over age 10 will be required to wear face masks starting Friday inside public spaces in Virginia, an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Ralph Northam said Tuesday.

Masks to be required inside public places starting Friday, Northam says

fischbobber's picture

Good.

It's the smart thing to do. I blame myself for thinking we had a competent enough government to get us something in the way of football.

jbr's picture

Increase in positive Knox County virus cases

Knox County has seen a "statistically significant" increase in positive COVID-19 cases for several days, a signal that's prompting more health employees to return to help with contact tracing to track the potential spread of the virus, Health Department Director Dr. Martha Buchanan said Wednesday.

Increase in positive Knox County virus cases draws Health Department's scrutiny

jbr's picture

Kroger: Three workers test positive for coronavirus Cedar Bluff

I started going to Publix at University Commons almost exclusively a month or so ago because all employees wore masks and they are on top of buggy and basket cleaning. I wasn't seeing that diligence at Krogers and Food City.

Grocer Kroger says three workers at its Cedar Bluff store on Kingston Pike have tested positive for COVID-19.

Kroger: Three workers test positive for coronavirus at Cedar Bluff store in Knoxville

bizgrrl's picture

Someone posted about this on

Someone posted about this on Twitter a couple of days ago. Been waiting for the new report.

Also heard on Twitter that there were some cases reported at the Lowes in East Knoxville. Waiting on an official report.

Yes, we have noticed Publix has done a better job. Hope it continues.

Factchecker's picture

Context

Of course, we're dealing with an Executive branch of the federal government that is fact-averse, science averse, averse to proactive reasoning and studies that would guide us in such sudden crises, and which shut down virtually all budgeted efforts to learn and prepare for these things ahead of time. Even George W. Bush understood the value of doing the science.

So absence such preparation and while we have no leadership or competence at leading, and confronted with a mystery virus that academia is scrambling to learn new, different, and sometimes seemingly contradictory things about, what should we be doing instead?

Should every science study that gets something wrong about this novel virus result in punishment, defunding, etc. of the institution behind its publication? That would have a tragic and chilling effect. Unless there was intended fraud, which I don't believe is being alleged here, that would be just another self-inflicting wound to a country where expertise is already being dangerously but systematically dismantled by political right-wing ideology.

R. Neal's picture

The federal government (at

The federal government (at least the executive part, that, you know, executes government policy, programs and functions) is no longer functioning. Health care, pubic health, regulatory agencies, even the Post Office have been politicized and weaponized. Information is no longer reliable. No help is coming. Only lies.

Sadly, the incompetence and indifference is trickling down to Red State governments and even local governments.

Let's hope that the defense department is still functioning on at least some basic level of readiness. We are vulnerable.

Factchecker's picture

A red light signifies the

A red light signifies the trends are not moving towards benchmark attainment and may indicate mid-phase adjustments need to be made, according to the health department.

That last sentence is interesting. I wonder what the county mayor would like to do at this point. Follow the plan or continue reopening at the same or quicker pace?

jbr's picture

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

Several southern U.S. states reported sharp increases in COVID-19 infections, with Alabama, South Carolina and Virginia all seeing new cases rise 35% or more in the week ended May 31 compared with the prior week, according to a Reuters analysis.

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

R. Neal's picture

Let's also recognize AC for

Let's also recognize AC for making an early, tough, personally and financially painful decision to cancel Big Ears in the interest of public health and safety. And, if I recall correctly, he did it before any official government action or guidance.

fischbobber's picture

Great Point!

Great communities need great leaders. Both Randy and AC fit that bill.

Roger Fleenor's picture

Let's also recognize AC

Indeed.

Roger Fleenor's picture

Let's also recognize AC

Indeed.

AC's picture

Thanks, Randy (and

Thanks, Randy (and fischbobber and Roger). I appreciate that.

It was a difficult decision - we had, as always, put heart and soul into the 2020 festival, and it was selling out for the first time ever over two weeks in advance. It was amazing how fast things were moving that week however. What seemed sadly but clearly necessary to us (but not everyone) on Tuesday night was painfully evident to all within a day or two. By Thursday, concerts all across the county were being canceled and by the weekend venues everywhere were closing.

We had the benefit of a lot information - European friends, colleagues and artists were giving us almost minute-by-minute updates on what was going there and what was clearly coming here. Some American artists were returning from European tours with their heads spinning because things were changing so fast. I also have family - my sister-in-law and our two nieces who are all in medical profession in Germany - were providing additional information and insight.

It has been an extraordinary experience watching this pandemic unfold - and a sad and frustrating one to witness the lack of thoughtful, strong, intelligent, unified leadership here in the USA in addressing it. We still have some bold and exciting plans and hopes to return in early 2021, but my greatest fear is that the current strategy will backfire and extend the pain even further. I hope I'm wrong. Thanks again for the acknowledgment.

fischbobber's picture

A bit of irony........

I see mandated masks for a lot of business models, including festivals and entertainment.

The longer our county mayor keeps being a spoiled brat, the longer it will take various businessmen, like promoters, to get safe business plans up and sell the changes to an audience and customer base. Nobody wants to come somewhere where everybody's sick.

Moon's picture

What if everybody's sick, but no one knows it?

"Nobody wants to come somewhere where everybody's sick."

What if everybody's sick, but no one knows it?

The return of football players to campuses will provide useful data. At P5 schools you will have 100 young, presumably healthy males, from across the country. None (few?) are C19 symptomatic, but the entire population will be tested. It will give us some insight into current infection rates among a population that (from my personal knowledge) has been generally non-compliant with any mitigation efforts.

AC's picture

unless it's a masked ball, I

unless it's a masked ball, I don't see masks generally catching on at festivals and concerts. And not social distancing either. Concerts and especially festivals are social events. While there are a few innovative ideas being explored short term, the reality is that festivals and concerts as we know them will return when people have reasonable assurances that they aren't risking their health in attending. It's likely to be a while. I do remain hopeful.

fischbobber's picture

Didn't know if you saw this or not.

(link...)

Brushy Mountain. This weekend.

fischbobber's picture

You know.....

I saw that on my first go round looking for a link to share with that news, and I saw the link you posted and dismissed it quickly because of the skyscraper in the back ground. Then I hit your link and looked at it again and realized, damn, that's a guard tower.

Wonder how many we had there from Knoxville? Looks like a superspreader.

Factchecker's picture

Good resource

Anyone not following Andy Slavitt on this subject should check out his efforts. He also has a great podcast, In the Bubble.

jbr's picture

Florida's surge in coronavirus cases. But there's good news ...

First, the bad news: The number of new coronavirus cases reported in Florida each day has increased an average of roughly 46% over the past week, according to a national tracking website.

But the percentage of coronavirus test results that turn out to be positive is only 4%...

The World Health Organization has recommended governments stay at a "testing positivity" rate of 5% or lower for at least 14 days before reopening.

Just in time for summer, Florida's seeing a surge in coronavirus cases. But there's good news, too

Mike Knapp's picture

America is giving up

Alexis Madrigal & Robinson Meyer in the Atlantic - America Is Giving Up on the Pandemic

Americans have not fully grasped that we are not doing what countries that have returned to normal have done. Some countries have almost completely suppressed the virus. Others had large outbreaks, took intense measures, and have seen life return to normal. Americans, meanwhile, never stayed at home to the degree that most Europeans have, according to mobility data from Apple and Google. Our version of the spring lockdown looked more like Sweden’s looser approach than like the more substantial measures in Italy, or even the United Kingdom and France. Swedish public-health officials have acknowledged that this approach may not have been the best path forward.

bizgrrl's picture

Very sad.

Very sad.

Bill Lyons's picture

It is too early for science to explain the virus's spread

It is hard to escape the fact that there are some real gaps in knowledge in regard to community spread of Covid-19 and the efficacy of policy. The states have been labs to some degree and the results are not showing what one might have hypothesized from conventional wisdom. A couple of months ago many were pointing to Kentucky as shutting things down more thoroughly and earlier that we did in Tennessee. Also two states with Republican governors - Ohio and Georgia took very different steps with Georgia's governor being lambasted as callously opening too much and too soon. But as the table below demonstrates the results don't necessarily support the hypotheses implied by the above. Tennessee has fewer deaths per capita than Kentucky. Likewise Georgia fares no worse than Ohio.

NBC: Corona Virus Deaths by State

It is too early for the data collection, hypothesis testing, and theory building that comprise the scientific method. I argued a month ago that we had no good models and that errors such as those that Moon cites may well lead to a collective eye roll when we are warned of a second wave.

Scientists need to explain models to build trust

The model building has been rushed, premature, and, not surprisingly, quite inaccurate. The assumptions change rapidly. Any modeling depends on capturing an almost infinite number of human decisions. The fact is that nobody has a handle on this.

I think Covid-19 is very serious. As a member of a vulnerable population I choose to wear a mask and carefully practice social distancing. But the science is not there yet to reliably guide policy. I find that especially troubling because trust in science is undercut when what is claimed to be science produces results so far from the mark. The last thing we need is to unwittingly undercut the scientific method as the basis of our knowledge of how are world functions.

fischbobber's picture

All good points.

Richard Briggs posts on facebook, they are a must read for trying to figure out both what's going on, and what direction to take.

It appears that our positive cases for Knoxville have skewed toward younger people. Near as I can tell, this is what accounts for our outstandingly low mortality rate. We have also avoided outbreak in Knoxville in our jails and assisted living facilities. In other words, by avoiding outbreaks in vulnerable pockets, we thus far have been able to avoid both deaths and hospitalizations. This is not just a good thing, it is a great thing. It is also something that could literally change overnight. Ignoring the problem and pretending it will go away on its own is not only bad science, it is bad public policy.

I don't know if I would credit the more successful responses to this crisis a result of great scientific modeling or just common sense and luck. I think there's doubt that if our luck in Knox County doesn't hold, there's a great chance that current county policy could quite likely destroy the Knox County economy for a generation. By sticking with our current laissez-faire, hands off policy of come what may, as it relates to covid-19, we expose ourselves to not only known risk, but to the risks of the unknown. Setting our community up to being the petrie dish of the next really crappy effect of this virus shouldn't be the goal of any of us.

As such, now would be the time to be proactive. Essential stores should declare whether they are mask only, or mask optional. The County should provide a forum for mask-only stores to advertise the in business, in a free county financed web site. Mayor Jacobs has declared us prisoners of the state by not affording us low risk avenues for essential behavior, and those in the private sector that choose to step up to serve this need should have access to forum. And those of us sentenced to our house or our health should have an option. I don't want to do business with people whose first priority is not the health and well being of their customers and associates. These people should have free access to forum. It is is the general welfare of our community. And they are doing the work government is mandated to do.

Covid is serious and right now Knoxville is an anomaly. If someone knows why, they certainly aren't advertising the information. For our community to come through this together we must find common ground, and common purpose. We must each do our part, but beyond that we must elevate the level of acknowledgement that those around us get for doing theirs. From local, to state, to federal we must demand leadership from our elected officials and hold them accountable for listening to the scientists and articulating exactly the course of action we're taking for exactly the reasons.

Mike Knapp's picture

Gaps in scientific knowledge don't explain the COVID reduxn gaps

But the science is not there yet to reliably guide policy.

Let me humbly change that for ya Bill - the science is there to reliably guide policy.

I would agree that there have been and certainly continue to be gaps in scientific knowledge about COVID. Some of these gaps have closed as the scientific community grinds away at this serious public health issue - masks work. Others still remain at large - why and how does blood type matter? Here's one place to check in on the status of the science where papers are free. And here's the indispensable Derek Lowe who writes from the leading edge of treatments.

The fact is that nobody has a handle on this.

However the general thrust from above - that reducing COVID spread remains a mystery because of a supposed gray area in which the scientific method has been inadequately applied, or perhaps because there is not enough data to apply it - is a concept to take issue with. The policies that are supported by science and adopted by countries with policy makers like yourself who appreciate science and deploy its findings have seen consistent reduction in the spread of COVID.

Masks work, testing/tracing/isolating work and paying people to stay home so that they don't spread at work works.

Maybe your comments about the scientific method concern themselves with more about the predictive value of models than whether science, specifically the science of public health, as an endeavor can reduce COVID spread. In this regard I would agree that the models are only as good as the data that are input into them and that also some policy makers mosdef cherry-picked some models over others. We can see for example how they've improved and changed over time for example comparing the IHME vs Los Alamos versions here.

In sum, if "nobody" (translated - all ppl and policy makers) doesn't have a handle on the spread then how do we explain this image below? In Europe they're watching us with alarm. Why?

I hope that you, being in close proximity to power, would advise those with decision-making abilities to not throw their hands up or give them cover. Rather I hope you would say that science can guide their hands and play the opposite role by remaining steadfast in the belief that the science, although always evolving with new data, gives us a solid basis for the public health decisions that have driven the spread to low levels from New Zealand and South Korea to the recovering hotspot of the EU.

USA population = 331 million
EU population = 446 million

jbr's picture

Virus. smirus, Las Vegas opens

jbr's picture

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

Among others for the week ending June 7, 2020 ...

Total Cases Per 100k New Cases 1-week change
Tennessee 26,381 386 3,375 +18.0%

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

jbr's picture

"By attending the Rally, you

"By attending the Rally, you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19 and agree not to hold Donald J. Trump for President, Inc.; BOK Center; ASM Global; or any of their affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, contractors, or volunteers liable for any illness or injury," the disclaimer reads.

Trump campaign says it can't be held liable if rally attendees contract coronavirus

bizgrrl's picture

Whatta ya gonna do? It's kind

Whatta ya gonna do? It's kind of funny, but then sad. Do you think the attendees just don't care? Sure they'll sign the waiver just to be with Trump.

jbr's picture

Seems like a natural occasion

Seems like a natural occasion to do well organized, thorough, contact tracking

I wonder if they have the intention to do so?

mjw's picture

Donor data

Only if the contact is to ask for a check.

jbr's picture

Steroid drug hailed as 'breakthrough' for seriously ill COVID-19

A cheap and widely-used steroid called dexamethasone has become the first drug shown to be able to save the lives of COVID-19 patients in what scientists said is a “major breakthrough” in the coronavirus pandemic

Steroid drug hailed as 'breakthrough' for seriously ill COVID-19 patients

jbr's picture

Sevier County's COVID-19 cases are rising. What does that mean?

No one was wearing masks; hardly anyone was social distancing. Meanwhile, the confirmed cases of COVID-19 jumped by 23 on Saturday to a total of 382.

"The people who aren't wearing masks, they're risking their lives and ours," said Betty Holms of Sevierville. "You've just got to stay away from the public and be smart."

Sevier County's COVID-19 cases are rising. What does that mean?

jbr's picture

Washington state makes face masks mandatory ...

The governor of Washington state on Tuesday ordered residents to wear face masks in public as officials across the country sought new means to control the coronavirus pandemic while easing clamp-downs on residents and reopening the economy.

Washington state makes face masks mandatory as some states see new coronavirus surge

Washington becomes the latest state to mandate wearing masks in public

jbr's picture

Angry residents erupt at meeting over new mask rule

Residents of Palm Beach County in Florida erupted in anger at a commissioner's meeting after an unanimous vote to make masks mandatory.

Angry residents erupt at meeting over new mask rule

jbr's picture

North Carolina say they won't enforce the state's mask mandate

Three sheriffs in North Carolina have declared that they will not be enforcing Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's statewide mask mandate despite a growing number of coronavirus cases.

Several sheriffs in North Carolina say they won't enforce the state's mask mandate

jbr's picture

Face mask debate turns fierce

jbr's picture

Last 7 days 36 states have showed an upward trend

The rethinking of how to safely reopen the US comes as 36 states have showed an upward trend in average new daily cases -- an increase of at least 10% -- over the last seven days, as of Tuesday, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

These states are: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Two states saw average daily cases decline more than 10% over those seven days: New Jersey and Rhode Island.

Many states hit pause on reopening but experts say the spread of coronavirus is now hard to control

jbr's picture

Best DIY face mask material, quilting cotton beats bandana

Researchers at Florida Atlantic University have experimented with different materials and styles of non-medical masks and found that a well-fitted stitched mask made from two layers of quilting fabric was the most effective in stopping the spread of droplets from emulated coughs and sneezes.

They found that droplets from a simulated uncovered cough were able to travel more than 8 feet; with a bandana they traveled 3 feet, with a folded cotton handkerchief, they traveled 1 foot, 3 inches; and with the cone-style mask, droplets traveled about 8 inches. With the stitched-quilting fabric mask, they traveled 2.5 inches.

The best DIY face mask material and fit? Quilting cotton beats bandana, new study suggests

jbr's picture

NY, NJ and CT expand quarantine advisories for travelers from 8

Ahead of the July Fourth weekend, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut on Tuesday expanded travel advisories requiring people arriving from eight additional southern and midwestern states to quarantine for 14 days.

As of Tuesday, the Democratic governors from the tri-state area are requiring self-quarantine for travelers from: Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nevada, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah. The requirement was first announced for eight states last week.

NY, NJ and CT expand quarantine advisories for travelers from 8 more states with high coronavirus rates

jbr's picture

See ways innovators are making masks worth your while

See how innovators are improving face masks so that preventing coronavirus is not the only thing they do

See ways innovators are making masks worth your while

jbr's picture

Goldman Sachs says they (face masks) could help save the economy

"Our analysis suggests that the economic benefit from a face mask mandate and increased face mask usage could be sizable," Hatzius wrote.

Trump says masks are a 'double-edged sword.' Goldman Sachs says they could help save the economy

Reducing the spread of the virus through mask-wearing, the analysts found, could be a substitute for strict lockdown measures that would otherwise shave 5%—or $1 trillion—off the U.S. GDP.

A National Mask Mandate Could Save The U.S. Economy $1 Trillion, Goldman Sachs Says

R. Neal's picture

JPMorgan analyzed data from

(link...)

JPMorgan analyzed data from 30 million Chase cardholders and Johns Hopkins University’s case tracker and found that higher restaurant spending in a state predicted a rise in new infections there three weeks later.

In-person restaurant spending was “particularly predictive.”

Conversely, higher spending at supermarkets predicted a slower spread of the virus.

Mike Knapp's picture

That’s a solid,

Would love to see that split out with a “bars” category and rerun

R. Neal's picture

Mexico building their own wall?

Mexican border states raise new concern about Americans bringing coronavirus south

As cases have increased in Southern California, Arizona and Texas, Mexican border states have increasingly come to see the outbreak in the United States as their biggest threat in controlling the epidemic.

..

On Thursday, the Mexican government said it would be installing “sanitary filters,” where travelers from the United States will have their temperatures checked at several border crossings. Those checkpoints have “the goal of protecting the health of the Mexican population, particularly those in the border states,” said a statement from the Mexico Foreign Ministry.

jbr's picture

GOP governor: I opened the bars too soon

Crowds continue to pack bars around the US as coronavirus continues to spread.

GOP governor: I opened the bars too soon

jbr's picture

Various states post daily COVID-19 records

The latest case numbers in Florida, which has yet to report statewide hospitalizations, surpassed the highest daily tally reported by any European county during the height of the coronavirus outbreak there.

In Texas, meanwhile, the number of new cases rose by a record 8,258 on Saturday. North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alaska, Missouri, Idaho and Alabama all registered new daily highs on Friday.

Despite the rising number of infections, the average daily U.S. death toll has gradually declined in recent weeks, reflecting the growing proportion of positive tests among younger, healthier people less prone to severe illness when infected.

Florida, Texas post daily COVID-19 records as 'positivity' rates climb

jbr's picture

Georgia Tech won't require students to wear masks on campus

Over 750 faculty at Georgia Tech signed a letter to the University System of Georgia's Board of Regents saying that the school's plan to reopen campus without face mask requirements is dangerous and not based on science.

Georgia Tech won't require students to wear masks on campus. Faculty aren't happy.

jbr's picture

Face shields AND face masks now mandatory on Qatar Airways

Qatar Airways has taken this a step further, announcing that its passengers will be required to wear a face shield -- in addition to a face mask or face covering.

The Middle East carrier says it will be issuing fliers with protection kits -- including face shields, hand sanitizer, a surgical face mask and disposable gloves -- before they board its airplanes.

Face shields AND face masks now mandatory on Qatar Airways

jbr's picture

Miami-Dade to shut down restaurants again as Florida's Covid-19

Wear masks and socially distance and this probably doesn't happen

As of Wednesday, restaurants in the county, the state's most populous, will be shut down -- again -- except for takeout and delivery, county Mayor Carlos Gimenez announced in a news release. The mayor's executive order will also close party venues, fitness centers and short-term accommodation rentals.

Miami-Dade to shut down restaurants again as Florida's Covid-19 hospitalizations surge

jbr's picture

United States at risk of outstripping COVID-19 testing capacity

If demand continues to accelerate and shortages are not resolved, then turnaround times for test results will rise, tests will effectively be rationed, and the number of infections that are never counted in official statistics will grow. Any plan to contain the virus will depend on fast and accurate testing, which can identify newly infectious people before they set off new outbreaks. Without it, the U.S. is in the dark.

A Dire Warning From COVID-19 Test Providers

'Why is it taking so long?' | East Tennesseans wait for COVID-19 results as laboratories see influx of testing

jbr's picture

Dozens of Mississippi lawmakers have coronavirus

About one in six state lawmakers have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to Dr. Thomas Dobbs of the Mississippi Health Department.

For weeks, politicians flouted mask recommendations inside the state Capitol. Twenty-six state legislators have now tested positive for Covid-19, including Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann and State House Speaker Philip Gunn. Neither man wore a mask at a bill signing at the governor's mansion last week.

Dozens of Mississippi lawmakers have coronavirus after weeks of refusing to wear masks

jbr's picture

Local restaurant closes for week

Emma's on Sutherland Facebook page ...

We are closing for one week. We have had some positive tests come back today in our Knoxville stores and we want to get an idea of what we are dealing with.

The Burgers- Sutherland

jbr's picture

Pathologist found blood clots in 'almost every organ'

Some Covid-19 patients are known to develop blood clotting issues, but the degree and the extent to which that occurs was described as "dramatic" by Rapkiewicz.

Pathologist found blood clots in 'almost every organ' during autopsies on Covid-19 patients

jbr's picture

COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns

“When a university sneezes, the town gets pneumonia. Now when the university has pneumonia, what does that mean for the town?” Stephen Gavazzi, professor of human sciences at Ohio State University, said. “College towns have shops, bars, restaurants, hotels and apartments entirely dependent on students.”

Now, as campuses are unveiling their reopening plans to only hold a fraction of their usual capacity this fall, college towns face an existential threat.

COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns and businesses are struggling to survive

R. Neal's picture

Immunity to covid-19 could

Immunity to covid-19 could disappear in months, a new study suggests

The study: Researchers at King’s College London repeatedly tested 96 patients and health-care workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust for antibodies between March and June. All the participants were confirmed to have had covid-19, either via a PCR test or a positive antibody test. The researchers found that levels of virus-fighting antibodies peaked about three weeks after symptoms started and then rapidly fell away. Although 60% of participants produced a “potent” antibody response while they had covid-19, only 17% had the same level of potency at the end of the three-month testing period. Antibody levels were higher and longer-lasting in people who had had more severe cases of covid-19. For some milder cases, it was impossible to detect any antibodies at all at the end of the three months. The research is published in a preprint paper in medRxiv, which means the findings have yet to be subjected to peer review.

What it means: The study raises the prospect that, like other coronaviruses, covid-19 could reinfect people repeatedly. If that’s the case, “herd immunity” may never arrive, either through a one-shot vaccine or through community spread of the virus, as any protective antibodies would wane with time. However, antibodies are not the only way people can fight off covid-19. T cells, which seek and destroy cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, could also provide some protection. In short, we have not yet generated enough data from patients to be able to draw conclusions on immunity with a high degree of certainty. There have been anecdotal reports of people catching covid-19 for a second time, but none have been confirmed.

jbr's picture

1 in 3 young adults vulnerable to severe Covid-19

The researchers found 32% of the total study population were medically vulnerable for severe Covid-19. However, when the group of participants who smoked cigarettes or e-cigarettes were taken out of the analysis, the medically vulnerable percentage decreased by half, to 16%.

"Recent evidence indicates that smoking is associated with a higher likelihood of COVID-19 progression, including increased illness severity, ICU admission or death," said Sally Adams, lead author of the study and a specialist at University of California, San Francisco's National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, in a press release. "Smoking may have significant effects in young adults, who typically have low rates for most chronic diseases."

1 in 3 young adults vulnerable to severe Covid-19 — and smoking plays a big part, research finds

jbr's picture

Knoxville allowing restaurants to seat customers outdoors

Knoxville Mayor Indya Kincannon announced Monday the city will be allowing restaurants to apply for temporary permits to add and expand outdoor seating to private parking lots, public parking spaces, and nearby underutilized public/private property.

Knoxville allowing restaurants to seat customers outdoors in parking lots with temp permits

jbr's picture

Walmart bans couple seen in video wearing Nazi swastika masks

I assume these two are registered voters. Another reason why everyone voting is important.

The unidentified man wearing the swastika face covering can be heard saying, "We're living under a socialist state."

Walmart bans couple seen in video wearing the Nazi swastika on their face coverings

fischbobber's picture

Voting

I voted today.

If everything works, it's got a good chance of working.

jbr's picture

Southern mayors push back on state coronavirus response

“The idea that every mayor, every governor, every local official, should figure out their own pandemic response and what to do and not to do is crazy,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, who led research on Ebola and currently advises policymakers on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jha explained the best way to respond to a pandemic is through national and state level guidance that is customized to local needs, which states ultimately did in the Northeast when they faced their spikes early on — though he noted that governors there waited a week or two too long to react.

Southern mayors push back on state coronavirus response

jbr's picture

Three simple acts can stop Covid-19 outbreaks, study finds

If people washed their hands regularly, wore masks, and kept their social distance from each other, these three simple behaviors could stop most all of the Covid-19 pandemic, even without a vaccine or additional treatments, according to a new study

"If we have that degree of compliance with these simple measures, our models say that's really as good as shutting it down," Giroir said. "These simple facts can really shut down the outbreak without completely shutting down your local area."

Three simple acts can stop Covid-19 outbreaks, study finds

jbr's picture

Hotels attempt to adapt

jbr's picture

Motor vehicle fatalities

Motor vehicle fatalities surged by 23.5 percent in May, as drivers took advantage of open roads to push to autobahn speeds, a situation made easier by the fact that authorities in many communities were pulling back on enforcement, in part, to avoid risking the possibility of their officers becoming exposed to the coronavirus.

Highway deaths spike for third-straight month as drivers take advantage of empty roads

jbr's picture

Birx warns of concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities

White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx privately told a group of state and local health officials Wednesday about a concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities as President Donald Trump continues to tout progress amid the coronavirus pandemic at scripted, on-message briefings this week.

"There are cities that are lagging behind and we have new increases in Miami, New Orleans, Las Vegas, San Jose, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Nashville, Pittsburgh, Columbus and Baltimore, so we're tracking this very closely.

Birx warns of concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities as Trump paints a rosy picture

jbr's picture

I would not get on a plane or eat inside a restaurant

MarketWatch: I presume you are not hanging out in restaurants or bars. Is it really more dangerous to eat indoors at a restaurant than outdoors?

Fauci: Yes, absolutely. Indoors is much worse than outdoors. If you’re going to go to a restaurant, try as best as you can to have outdoor seating that is properly spaced between the tables.

MarketWatch: So you’re not going to restaurants? You wouldn’t risk it?

Fauci: I am not going to restaurants right now.

Fauci tells MarketWatch: I would not get on a plane or eat inside a restaurant

jbr's picture

Technology making sure workers wearing face masks and distance

At an acrylic fiber factory in Callao, Peru, surveillance cameras and artificial intelligence are tackling a pandemic-era challenge: making sure workers are wearing face masks and staying at least six feet apart.

Cameras that were already in place in the factory provide video that is analyzed by Camio's AI software, pointing out behaviors that would normally seem innocuous but could contribute to the spread of coronavirus. This can range from people walking together in a hallway toward a cafeteria for lunch to a supervisor approaching a worker to have a conversation.

An algorithm may warn you to keep your distance from others

jbr's picture

New technology tests common surfaces for presence of coronavirus

The makers of a new test say that you can use a simple swab to find out in 48 hours if any surface is contaminated with the virus that causes COVID-19.

New test allows people to swab for coronavirus on surfaces in public places

Factchecker's picture

Interesting, given there's

Interesting, given there's little reason to expect significant risk of infection from surfaces. While many of us us have been sanitizing our mail, and more public surface cleaning is generally long overdue, I thought we can pretty much stop worrying about that. (I've almost have stopped decontaminating mail, except out of habit.)

Has anyone heard of any infections that were suspected to have occurred via surface contact?

P.S. This might be more of a tracing thing(?). 48 hours seems long to wait too.

jbr's picture

Mask dispute leaves Staples customer with broken leg

Margot Kagan, of Teaneck, told police she was using a fax machine at the store when a woman with a mask pulled down below her mouth approached a machine next to her. Kagan, who, according to police, had a liver transplant four months ago and was walking with a cane, told the woman to put her mask on.

Mask dispute leaves Staples customer with broken leg after woman throws her to ground

bizgrrl's picture

Too many of these attacks

Too many of these attacks happening. If someone comes close to me without a mask, I make a best effort to leave the area. It is too unsafe to ask others to wear a mask, keep their distance, be safe.

jbr's picture

Jordan is playing politics and Fauci isn't

jbr's picture

bands are playing parking lots to give heartsick fans their fix

Welcome to the drive-in concert, a potential cure for heartsick music fans who yearn for live shows amid the coronavirus.

Third Eye Blind and other bands are playing parking lots to give heartsick fans their fix

jbr's picture

20,000 more Americans could die from Covid-19 in next 21 days

The CDC says new deaths are likely to increase in Alabama, Kentucky, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, Tennessee and Washington. Some of these states previously reported progress in their coronavirus numbers but are now raising their alarm again.

20,000 more Americans could die from Covid-19 in the next 21 days, CDC ensemble forecast shows

jbr's picture

Knox County reports 83 new cases, three new deaths Sunday

Of the 38 deaths in the county, 33 have occurred since the beginning of July

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 83 new cases, three new deaths Sunday

jbr's picture

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 12th death in last

Knox County has now reported 12 new deaths in the last five days. Of the 39 deaths in the county, 34 have occurred since the beginning of July.

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 12th death in last five days

fischbobber's picture

Board of Health meeting 8/5

I contacted the Board of Health after the July 30 meeting (the morning of July 31) and got an e-mailed response from Dr. Buchanon that I would be added to the list. Mayor Jacobs had said during the meeting that he and the Board of Health would "work something out." When calling to confirm location and time this morning, I was informed that Mayor Jacobs had taken over this part of the meeting and that he would determine who did and didn't speak. I will call in the morning to sign up, but I suspect the process has been rigged. Mayor Jacobs is clearly organizing a mob and aside from the very real risk of infection, there is also the very real danger of physical threats in this situation. Any advice or feedback from people more experienced in this sort of thing would be appreciated.

R. Neal's picture

According to a press release,

According to a press release, the meeting will be via zoom but Jacobs portion will be at the City County Bldg and requires in-person attendance:

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— At 5 p.m. Wednesday, the Knox County Board of Health will convene via Zoom for its weekly meeting. As proposed by Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs last week, the Board will observe 30 minutes of public forum at the start of the meeting. Each speaker will have up to three minutes to address the Board.

Although the medical professionals serving the Board of Health have declined to attend in person the meeting being held in the City/County Building’s Main Assembly Room—where public forum will take place—Mayor Jacobs will patch into the Zoom meeting from there.

“When this began, the Board of Health acted as an advisory council, but now these doctors are drafting and approving public policy,” said Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs. “No public institution I’ve ever seen can make these types of sweeping regulations without public input. Transparency is the greatest tool we have in government, and this situation is no different.”

To register for public forum, Knox County residents must call the Mayor’s Office at 865-215-2005 to speak to Marsha between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. tomorrow, Aug. 4. Due to time constraints, roughly ten people will be able to participate in the public forum, with a few others queued just in case some don’t use all their allotted speaking time.

Those speaking at public forum will come to the City/County Building at 400 Main Street to work with on-site staff to join the meeting.

In addition to those seats reserved for public forum participants, the Main Assembly can accommodate 50 physically distanced people in its upper and lower levels. The line for entry will be form outside the Main Street entrance of the City/County Building. Physical access to the meeting will be restricted when capacity for the Main Assembly is met. PBA will provide masks to those who don’t have them.

fischbobber's picture

Yup

It’s not enough that Jacobs is trying to rig the forum, he’s forcing all those who wish to speak to a super spreader event. I guess I’ll get ready to get my ass whipped, catch a deadly disease, and die. We all gotta go sometime from something I guess.

Treehouse's picture

Thanks for showing up

WTF Casual Pint? It's really so necessary for you to serve beer in person?!?!
(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

N95 mask, gloves, goggles if

N95 mask, gloves, goggles if you have them.

Hmmmm.... will they take you seriously?

I wouldn't put my life in their hands.

fischbobber's picture

Up at 8:36

Played "It's the seventies and I'm calling the radio station to win a prize" for fifteen minutes, finally got through and spent another fifteen minutes , more or less, on hold waiting for Marsha, whoever Marsha is. She took my information, asked me my topic (The importance of integrity in government officials during a pandemic) and said that the ,mayor's office would decide who would speak.

Last week at the meeting, they said first come first serve.

I will wear a face shield and a mask, bring sanitizer and a hand towel should I get a call back. I'm not holding my breath.

I don't think this is being done because the mayor wants input. This is being done as a power play to try to intimidate the Board of Health. So no, I don't think the mayor will take anyone seriously. This is Kabuki Theatre.

R. Neal's picture

I don't think this is being

I don't think this is being done because the mayor wants input. This is being done as a power play to try to intimidate the Board of Health. So no, I don't think the mayor will take anyone seriously. This is Kabuki Theatre.

Ya think? Should have told her you wanted to tell them how they were trampling your rights and you were thinking about suing them.

fischbobber's picture

Looks like

Looks like I’m going to have to come up with something. I got the call from Marsha that I made the cut. Looks like I’ve got a little speech to write.

bizgrrl's picture

Wonderful.

Wonderful.

Mike Knapp's picture

Get it

Holler if you need some PPE.

R. Neal's picture

May the odds be ever in your

May the odds be ever in your favor.

Factchecker's picture

Good times...

Remember when one of the popular political slogans used by many now in the anti-mask constituency was "Freedom isn't Free"? It's almost as if they never believed in real shared sacrifice.

R. Neal's picture

Way to go

Way to go fischbobber!

(link...)

Knox Co. video, first speaker...

(link...)

fischbobber's picture

Thanks.

I hope I persuaded some measure of good for Knox County.

I've never really done anything like that before.

jbr's picture

100 people in Ohio were infected after man attended church

A man with Covid-19 went to church in mid-June, then 91 other people got sick, including 53 who were at the service, according to Ohio's governor.

"It spread like wildfire, wildfire. Very, very scary," Gov. MIke De Wine said Tuesday

Almost 100 people in Ohio were infected with coronavirus after man attended church service

jbr's picture

One death every 80 seconds

Over the last seven days, a grim new COVID-19 calculus has emerged: one person died every 80 seconds from the coronavirus in America.

One death every 80 seconds: The grim new toll of COVID-19 in America

jbr's picture

Leading Causes of Death in US

Covid-19 is heading to #3 on this list

Leading Causes of Death

fischbobber's picture

Bars

Welp, looks like expecting the bar owners to act in good faith and shut down at ten isn't going to work. At 11:15 all but three bars I saw, out of roughly twenty, were open and operating. Police presence was heavy, but there was no enforcement of the ordinance.

Moon's picture

That sounds like a

That sounds like a fascinating way to spend a perfectly good evening. I bet you're a blast at kid birthday parties.

Welp, looks like expecting the bar owners to act in good faith and shut down at ten isn't going to work. At 11:15 all but three bars I saw, out of roughly twenty, were open and operating. Police presence was heavy, but there was no enforcement of the ordinance.

R. Neal's picture

I think he was probably

I'd bet he was probably coming home from work.

fischbobber's picture

Work

That’s exactly what I was doing. After I got home, I worked on my lunch for today. Then I sat in my back yard with my dog, listened to cicadas and wondered what it would have been like to be born with a silver spoon in my mouth. 42 years as a Teamster and UPSer. Am I supposed to be embarrassed about doing honest work for a living?

fischbobber's picture

My bad

My seniority date is August 15, 1977. It would have been more accurate to say 43 years.

bizgrrl's picture

Congrats on the long term

Congrats on the long term employment at what I perceive is a good company.

fischbobber's picture

It’s brought me security

It’s the toughest place to work in America. But if you show up for work, you can expect a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. You can’t say that about a whole lot of places these days.

And thanks. I’m pretty proud of my time with the company.

Factchecker's picture

Congrats and thanks

So you drive for them? I have a BIL (not in these parts) who did that until he retired and know others who had careers there. UPS is known for good pay and benefits. So it's thanks to the union? More people should know that, if so. It would make clearer the failure of (anti-union) neoliberalism.

fischbobber's picture

I thnk

Things are going to change so fast in short order, it's going to be hard to keep up with them.

I hope the union can keep up. I don't know that they have enough people staffed to keep up.

I drove package for over twenty-five years. Now, I shift trailers.

Factchecker's picture

What's driving this change?

What's driving this change? Growth? Technology? Corporate culture?

fischbobber's picture

Mostly technology.

While we are still a labor intensive culture, more and more operations are being taken over by robots (for lack of a better term). We have a hub in Nashville that unloads semis, for instance, without humans. We are in the process of testing self-driving semis and the technology exists to do home deliveries via robotics, drones, robots etc.

Our corporate culture went through its big change when we went public.

(link...)

(link...)

I'm sixty-one. Good Lord willing, I will be alive when my job is eliminated. Jobs for laborers are in flux. People just don't pay attention until the day their job is eliminated.

Growth is hard to plan anymore. The company projected a reduction in volume because of this pandemic, for instance. Instead, business has exploded. Our growth is dependent on human behavior beyond our control.

Treehouse's picture

And undermining government services

In case you don't read Heather Cox Richardson, you are really missing a lot of information. Today, her post began with this which speaks to the USPS and UPS:

"The Friday night news dump was about the United States Postal Service. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, a Trump loyalist, has recently created new rules for the agency that have dramatically slowed the delivery of mail just as mail-in voting for 2020 has begun. Today, DeJoy overhauled the USPS, releasing a new organizational chart that displaces postal executives with decades of experience and concentrates power in DeJoy himself. Twenty-three executives have been reassigned or fired; five have been moved in from other roles. The seven regions of the nation will become four, and the USPS will have a hiring freeze. DeJoy says the new organization will create “clear lines of authority and accountability.”

There is reason to be suspicious of DeJoy’s motives. Not only have his new regulations slowed mail delivery, but also under him the USPS has told states that ballots will have to carry first-class 55-cent postage rather than the normal 20-cent bulk rate, almost tripling the cost of mailing ballots. This seems to speak to Trump’s wish to make mail-in ballots problematic for states. And DeJoy and his wife, Aldona Wos, whom Trump has nominated to become ambassador to Canada, own between $30.1 million and $75.3 million of assets in competitors to the USPS. This seems to speak to the report issued by the Trump administration shortly after the president took office, calling for the privatization of the USPS."

fischbobber's picture

USPS

The USPS is crucial to UPS survival. Fed-Ex is just a giant money laundering operation with aging assets. Without the USPS , UPS quickly becomes a monopoly and has to be broken up. The present system works better.

Treehouse's picture

Darwin's law

I don't with illness on anyone but this could be a case where Darwin's law will come into play and solve the situation without any leadership from anybody.

jbr's picture

Which masks are the least effective

The most effective mask was the fitted N95. Three-layer surgical masks and cotton masks, which many people have been making at home, also performed well.

Neck fleeces, also called gaiter masks and often used by runners, were the least effective. In fact, wearing a fleece mask resulted in a higher number of respiratory droplets because the material seemed to break down larger droplets into smaller particles that are more easily carried away with air.

Folded bandanas and knitted masks also performed poorly and did not offer much protection.

"We were extremely surprised to find that the number of particles measured with the fleece actually exceeded the number of particles measured without wearing any mask,"

Researchers created a test to determine which masks are the least effective

fischbobber's picture

Welp

Looks like I'm retooling again.

I'm gonna sew diapers into my gaiters.

bizgrrl's picture

I've seen workers that do

I've seen workers that do heaving lifting wearing these gaiter masks and was pleased that they found something acceptable. Now, not so much. Geez.

fischbobber's picture

Interesting experiment

It's been pretty cool to watch the Board of Health operate. These folks are smart and fair. The integrity issues really stand out. This tinkering with regulation and looking for coordinated data points to factor in is not easy to measure. So one has a chance to build an observed data base. The restaurant and bar owners, as a group, show very little interest nor aptitude for policing themselves. This was certainly something the Board needed to know before making a decision. I've still got this little voice in my head saying, "If we could just get those ba**ards to go all in on masks for six weeks, we still got a shot at football."The big voice says I'm dreaming.

It was imperative to know the level of seriousness with which the restaurant industry, as a group, was going to respond to this collective crisis. They have been given their chance. As a group, they've done poorly. There were interesting and notable exceptions to that general observation, both from a high end integrity statement and a pretty creative cheating standpoint. This will be an important fact to consider in the event that the UT start-up goes poorly from an outbreak standpoint. No on-premise alcohol sales after 10:00 for anyone would appear to be the smart move.

I have gotten the sense in the last few weeks that awareness is up. And people are getting the message. Folks my age are happy about not getting sneezed on, most of us grumble about masks. Mask use is growing in visibility, anyway. The more visible it is, the more people wear masks, the more people that wear masks, the fewer people get sick. The less people sick, the easier it is to reopen and retool business plans. You have customers.

Drinking masks are the obvious next move and bars should be given notice that mask designs for drinkers should be in all their plans. The next re-open will have to be better run than this one. The reasons should be obvious.

What's been cool about watching the Board operate though, is how much further ahead of the game they are than I am, as in "Whoa. Didn't see that one coming." sort of constant coming from them. These folks are smart. People should be paying attention.

jbr's picture

Mask use seems more

Mask use seems more commonplace to me. All sorts of folks wearing or pulling them out of their pocket when move into congested area. We drove thru Sevier Ave and downtown tonight on way home and bars were closed except for Clanceys Tavern on Gay Street. They seemed crowded and packed close together from my quick glance. Good spot to do tracing.

fischbobber's picture

Notable exceptions

There were a couple, three notable exceptions on Gay Street. There were also some folks playing semantics with the regulations. If the kitchens were open, they weren't cooking. At least I didn't smell them.

And yeah, you're right. Mask use was up, and it has been rising. Some are of the theory that mask use is driving our downward tic. It's a bit early to tell, but if increased mask use is driving our downward trend, it means we've reached the point where it becomes effective. That's a huge milestone in fighting this disease. It gives control back to the community.

The fam is vacating and I took the dog for a drive tonight.

fischbobber's picture

Last night 11:15

Crowds down, mask usage up. Not sure if it was the ordinances or lack of customers driving that, but necessary and good to see. West side bars were up a bit.

jbr's picture

Laid-off set up soup kitchens in front of senators offices

This week, he and other hospitality workers are staging food giveaways for fellow workers in need — right in front of the offices of key US senators who have opposed extending unemployment benefits.

Laid-off workers set up soup kitchens in front of senators who oppose extending $600 checks

jbr's picture

Felony in Illinois to assault a worker enforcing face mask laws

Assaulting a worker who is enforcing face mask policies can now be prosecuted as aggravated battery in Illinois – a felony charge.

It's now a felony in Illinois to assault a retail worker who is enforcing face mask rules

Assaulting a worker who's enforcing masks is now a felony under a new Illinois law

jbr's picture

US colleges try to prevent and combat Covid-19 cases

Donde Plowman, the chancellor of University of Tennessee, Knoxville, said there were a total of 28 active cases, 20 of which were students and eight were employees. More than 150 people were in self-isolation last week, most of whom were non-residential students and employees.

"Part of what we look at to make decisions about campus operations are our ability to isolate and quarantine residential students as well as keeping up with contact tracing," Plowman said.

As students head back to campus, US colleges try to prevent and combat Covid-19 cases

jbr's picture

UNC-Chapel Hill goes to remote learning after 135 COVID-19 cases

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced Monday that it was converting to all virtual classes after reporting 135 new COVID-19 cases and four clusters within a week of starting in-person classes for the fall semester — an outcome many critics feared when the university decided to reopen.

UNC-Chapel Hill goes to remote learning after 135 COVID-19 cases within week of starting classes

jbr's picture

8 days into semester, Notre Dame halts in-person classes

The University of Notre Dame suspended in-person classes on Tuesday, eight days after the school’s fall semester began and after 146 students and a staff member tested positive for the coronavirus, officials said.

The two-week suspension, which is effective Wednesday for the school’s 12,000 students, came one day after the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill made a similar announcement and as Michigan State University on Tuesday ordered undergrads to stay home for the rest of the fall "effective immediately."

8 days into semester, Notre Dame halts in-person classes as 146 students get coronavirus

fischbobber's picture

Am I missing something?

How come the UT and County schools numbers aren't reflected in Knox County numbers? Or am I just missing the connection?

jbr's picture

UTK Chancellor on CNN now

UTK Chancellor on CNN now with Anderson Cooper

fischbobber's picture

Bearden football

It’s Wednesday. Bearden shut down football last Friday. The team/school is just now getting around to advising all players to quarantine and isolate. Apparently this disease is contagious. Who knew?

Edit: Update on the young man at Bearden. Looked like he was getting better for a day, then fever went back up and hallucinations set in. Hopefully, there is no imminent danger, nor long term effects. It’s scary.

fischbobber's picture

Bearden

It appears four coaches and an undetermined number of players have tested positive. Look for a similar situation to go down at Powell.

jbr's picture

American Airlines is dropping service to these 15 cities

The affected cities are Del Rio, Texas; Dubuque, Iowa; Florence, South Carolina; Greenville, North Carolina; Huntington, West Virginia, Joplin, MiIssouri; Kalamazoo, Michigan; Lake Charles, Louisiana; New Haven, Connecticut; New Windsor, New York; Roswell, New Mexico; Sioux City, Iowa; Springfield, Illinois; Stillwater, Oklahoma; and Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

American Airlines is dropping service to these 15 cities. This is likely only the beginning

jbr's picture

The odds of catching Covid-19 on an airplane

One explanation for the apparently low risk level is that the air in modern aircraft cabins is replaced with new fresh air every two to three minutes, and most planes are fitted with air filters designed to trap 99.99% of particles.

According to his findings, based on short haul flights in the US on aircraft configured with three seats on either side of the aisle, such as the Airbus 320 and the Boeing 737 -- and assuming everyone is wearing a mask -- the risk of catching the virus on a full flight is just 1 in 4,300. Those odds fall to 1 in 7,700 if the middle seat is vacant.

The odds of catching Covid-19 on an airplane are slimmer than you think, scientists say

Moon's picture

1 in 4,300? Reckless and irresponsible

A 1-in-4,300 chance of catching C-19 on a full flight means that another 18,000 Americans will get C-19 every month, resulting in 19 additional C-19 deaths every day. The Knoxville Airport Authority has this blood on its hands. Murderous. It should ground all TYS passenger traffic - or at least institute a 10:00 pm curfew.

bizgrrl's picture

The pandemic seems to be

The pandemic seems to be freaking you out more than usual, Moon.

Why is it such a problem that people want to protect themselves from death or serious illness from COVID-19? For some the long-term effects can be bad and shorten lives.

The article seems to be a bit anecdotal. Very little data. Not sure it is worthwhile.

Moon's picture

thank you

The article seems to be a bit anecdotal. Very little data. Not sure it is worthwhile.

My point, exactly.

fischbobber's picture

Seems like something you'd want to know

If one was considering flying on an airplane.

bizgrrl's picture

The two planes mentioned

The two planes mentioned rarely, if ever, fly out of airports the size of Knoxville, and many other airports.

There is not much data to support the statements.

Saw a video the othe day where passengers got into a fight because a passenger refused to wear a mask. The seating plan did not allow for much distancing. The plane looked about the size, or bigger, of planes flying out of TYS.

I feel sorry for anyone who has to fly, as a necessity. I cannot imagine why anyone would want to fly for pleasure.

fischbobber's picture

Thanks

Good to know. I rarely fly and try to avoid the airport at all costs. Good to know though.

jbr's picture

Seems like they would not be

Seems like they would not be allowed to enter the plane without a mask.

After you let someone on the plane without a mask it can be a lot of trouble to get them off.

bizgrrl's picture

Fight on American Airlines

jbr's picture

Boston University, other schools deploy robots

Boston University has deployed a high-tech weapon in its struggle to keep the COVID-19 pandemic from spreading on campus — robots.

Eight of them are now processing some 6,000 coronavirus tests per day out of a laboratory built and operated by BU researchers — and they are providing next-day results, NBC Boston reported.

Boston University, other schools deploy robots so campuses can safely reopen during pandemic

jbr's picture

How does coronavirus spread at a concert? Germans do a test

Researchers equipped each volunteer with contact tracers to record their routes in the arena and track the path of the aerosols — the small particles that could carry the virus — they emitted as they mingled and talked. Fluorescent disinfectants were used to highlight which surfaces at the mock concert were touched most frequently.

The results of the study are expected in four to six weeks, he said.

How does coronavirus spread at a concert? Germans do a test

jbr's picture

COVID Concert Experiment Shares Results

Adequate ventilation appears to be key to safely hosting mass gatherings of people in indoor venues. Researchers found that the density of viruses in aerosols was decreased through regular air circulation. “We knew that ventilation was important, but we didn’t expect it to be that important,” the team’s Dr. Michael Gekle told The New York Times.

Restart-19 COVID Concert Experiment Shares Results

jbr's picture

Knox County commissioner tests positive for COVID-19

Eighth District Commissioner Richie Beeler tested positive for the virus and two other commissioners, Carson Dailey and Charles Busler, who work closely with him have been asked to stay home until the end of August.

Knox County commissioner tests positive for COVID-19, two others in quarantine

jbr's picture

School tracks where students are at all times

Oklahoma State tracks the location data of students and staff who are signed on to campus Wi-Fi routers. The school also uses student card swipes, campus purchases and course attendance to complete contact tracing.

At Oklahoma State University, students' steps are tracked to stop the coronavirus

jbr's picture

Mask dispute leads to couple's assault on teen

A 17-year-old worker at a Pennsylvania theme park suffered a displaced jaw and will require surgery after he was assaulted by a couple he asked to wear masks, police said.

Mask dispute leads to couple's assault on teen Sesame Place worker, police say

First, it’s important to understand that human beings are driven by immediate benefits, rather than far-off consequences.

COVID-19's threat of death keeps masks and other preventive measures from being used

bizgrrl's picture

Disgusting. Many thanks to

Disgusting.

Many thanks to the president for encouraging violence.

jbr's picture

Over 1,000 students have tested positive for Covid-19 at Alabama

More than 1,000 students at the University of Alabama have tested positive for Covid-19 since classes resumed on the Tuscaloosa campus less than two weeks ago, according to the University of Alabama System.

The UA System coronavirus dashboard notes another 158 cases were recorded on campus over the course of the year prior to August 18, bringing the total to 1,201 cases. Classes resumed August 19.

Over 1,000 students have tested positive for Covid-19 at University of Alabama since classes resumed

jbr's picture

Delta’s No-Fly List Has Grown By 240 Because Of Mask Refusals

US carrier Delta Air Lines has added around 240 people to its no-fly list in recent weeks because they refused to wear a face mask.

Delta’s No-Fly List Has Grown By 240 Because Of Mask Refusals

fischbobber's picture

U.T.

It will be interesting to see to what degree UT handles both the spread of covid through the college campus and how it impacts the community. It will be equally as interesting to see to what degree business owners hold each other accountable for operating in the best interest of the market.

It will be interesting to see if these kids will grasp the concept of, "This isn't the last time you'll deal with something like this, it's the first." I know they don't grasp the concept of, "This one's really contagious." It's a global warming thing.A small deviation in temperature makes all the difference in the world, in a chemical reaction. We're going into uncharted territory.

It will be fascinating to watch how the downtown business owners keep coming together. I can see a "high dollar mask required doing the best we can, and hey, we got fans atmosphere." Do key fob in town contact tracing. When your bar's full, send customers to the next guy.If you patronize downtown businesses, they will be doing all they can to ensure that the disease isn't being spread, and in the inevitable situation that they find it in the restaurant district, those exposed can and will be informed. This would have to be a city initiative. I don't think the Board of Health has the staffing to handle something like this. Allow bar/restaurant owners holding privileges to key fobs, unless they were needed for tracing.

I think that's how you make the most money in Knoxville. Run it with a strict scientific policy, and back it up with the level of regulation it needs. That, quite frankly, has been the problem with Glenn Jacobs. He keeps acting like things are going to go back to how they were if he just does nothing. All he had to do was get on board with a mask policy when he seized Indya Kincannon's power, back at the end of April. That's all he had to do. Indya had done the heavy lifting, took the heat for being tough, never got the credit for what she accomplished. Between her and Dr. Buchanan, they got active cases down to thirteen before the anti-masker protests started showing up in the numbers. They were a good team. All Glenn Jacobs had to do was get on board with doing the right thing. All he had to do was the smart thing. All he had to do was his job. The work had all been done. All he had to do was let it go on, and take the credit. All he had to do was not screw it up. Had Glenn Jacobs done that, had he gotten behind a strong, bold, fashionable, Voltriotic, working plan involving masks, we'd be discussing how to make things up to overflow fans, not whether or not the UT students could infect the whole town.

JaHu's picture

It was nice seeing what

It was nice seeing what appeared to be all the BLM protesters on campus were wearing masks.

fischbobber's picture

Yes it was.

Quite the contrast to the strip the night before.

fischbobber's picture

9/1/2020

Starting September with 2316 active cases. 58 Deaths. 3.17% death rate in 65-74 year old range. 8.99% hospitalization (bankruptcy?) rate. 16 deaths, 1.02% death rate on my group, 45-64. 6.34% bankruptcy rate. This doesn't look good. Glenn Jacobs has turned what should have been the prime of our lives into some sort of dystopian nightmare whereby the younger generation infects the old and takes their money. This is what we get to live through in our prime of life? When is this guy going to start offering solutions, instead of ways to make this situation worse?

It's going to be a long, sickly September.

fischbobber's picture

Eerie

I know I worked late, and that it was raining, and that it was Tuesday, but tonight was the first night, since Indya was running the city's show that this town showed an indication that it could defeat the virus and still stay open. Masks work. Social distancing works. 10 o'clock curfews are a good idea to reduce the rate of infection. This should be measured and permitted accordingly.

I think that, right now, if what it takes to make it happen gets done, we've got a shot at football season. I also think the active case count will rise this week. This needs to be dealt with swiftly.

But in the dark, I saw hope. We can stay apart and holler through whatever is over our face, and still have football. We can day drink and go home. Plan our bad judgement and reduce the odds accordingly. We can control this situation if we work together as a community.

bizgrrl's picture

Well, what a positive

Well, what a positive outlook. Working together as a community is great. I can only hope it gets better. It will get better, but at what cost?

jbr's picture

Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver has died of complications of Lewy body dementia and COVID-19, the National Baseball Hall of Fame said in a statement Wednesday. He was 75.

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

R. Neal's picture

Big, tough, healthy guy with

Big, tough, healthy guy with a warning...

(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

UTs first game is against

UTs first game is against South Carolina.

fischbobber's picture

The new normal, numbers.

For the numbers nerds (like me) that pay attention to active cases, hospitalizations and deaths everyday, which I then cross check with what I observe with my own eyes on a nightly survey, you may have noticed a rather dramatic shift (a couple actually) in our active case numbers. A new metric is being used which drops a case from active to recovered in 14 days instead of 21.

Since I'm not a statistician, nor a pandemic expert, I don't feel qualified to offer an opinion as to whether of not the change was justified, but as a guy that tracks these numbers and compares them to what I see on the streets, I can tell you they are significant. On September 4th, 900 active cases were simply dropped from active to inactive (about 125 a day). This will affect the look of the numbers in two ways. First, it is a huge daily drop right off the bat. (Where did these 900 cases go?) Second, it will make the upcoming week appear to be a statistical nightmare (It was going to be bad to begin with.) The real effect it will have is masking just how bad this week is.

We are coming out of a pretty significant downturn. The mask ordinance and alcohol curfew had both translated into lower daily case numbers. I found the alcohol curfew most interesting because, until now, it has been self regulating. It was a unique experiment into what happens when you allow businesses the opportunity to do the right thing and regulate themselves. When taken as a whole, downtown businesses responded surprisingly well. While there are obvious and notable exceptions, by and large, downtown businesses have shown the capacity to recognize our situation for what it is and adjust their business plans accordingly. While clearly not having a perfect response, they have shown the capacity to adapt to the current climate. Most (over half) of them anyway. There has been an attempt to operate within the spirit , if not the letter, of the law. I always try to remember that the object of any regulation is to reduce the spread of the virus, not destroy the life of business of people the regulation affects.

The rest of our town can make no such boasts. Those attempting to comply are the exception, rather than the rule. The exceptions are there, but their neighbors are doing as much to kill their business as any regulation could. Move-in weekend and week was not that bad. I was rather surprised, and found a bit of hope, in that. Starting the following weekend, it became the wild, wild west. The Strip has turned into a nightly superspreader event and various so-called restaurants in other areas of town have begun packing in a late night crowd that appears to be far more interested into packing in a small area and drinking rather than social distancing and enjoying a meal.

We have begun another uptick, and this surge looks to be worse than the July surge. Our lack of enforcement of the 10 o'clock curfew is fixing to bite us in the butt. This would appear to be our largest surge yet, with three weeks of much larger numbers facing us in the short term. We've had 660 new cases in the last four days and that trend should hold for at least a couple weeks. It could get worse.

There may be a way to curb this surge without a complete 10 o'clock curfew on on premise alcohol sales, but I don't see it. And if something doesn't get done, there may be no alternative except a shut down. Something's going to have to happen. The numbers are unsustainable once again.

CathyMcCaughan's picture

In person school began two

In person school began two weeks ago. Don't put all the responsibility on bars.

fischbobber's picture

Those numbers

Those numbers won't really start showing up for a couple days.I do my survey on the ride home for work. Our case numbers run on about a 10-18 day delay from time of transmission to time when they show up in Health Department numbers.

I'm not an expert as to why this is, it's just an observed phenomena. I had chalked it up to incubation/transmission from infected source / delay in getting testing numbers. I look for the school numbers to start hitting this week, (though the last couple days could show some influence). I am not as in tune as to what to expect from schools as I am how street activity numbers relate to the big picture.

Depending on their effect, school numbers could present a serious issue that is just now showing up. Someone should probably be tracking schools as well though. They will be showing first wave results this week with secondary transmissions coming shortly thereafter.

You're right as it relates to multiple factors affecting the surge however. This next one will be a true community effort.

bizgrrl's picture

OMG, i went to Walmart today

OMG, i went to Walmart today around 11:15am to pick up a grocery item I couldn't get at my local grocer. Kind of freaked out a bit. Haven't been around that many maskless people since before the pandemic.

Will only be going there first thing in the morning of from now on.

fischbobber's picture

Yeah

There seems to be a counter-attack being launched by the maskless.

CathyMcCaughan's picture

Cedar Bluff Middle which is

Cedar Bluff Middle which is walking distance from the Kroger that had an outbreak, but they aren't the only school with active cases.

jbr's picture

West Virginia University suspends in-person undergrad classes

In a statement, university officials said the decision was made "in direct response to a recent increase in positive cases in students on the Morgantown campus, as well as concern for the probability of increased cases following several reports of parties held this holiday weekend where groups should have been in quarantine."

West Virginia University suspends in-person undergrad classes amid spike in COVID cases

jbr's picture

Counties with the highest number of recent cases per resident

Unless I am reading this wrong, a Tennessee county, Wayne, has by far the largest
number of virus cases the last 7 days. 1,189 cases the last 7 days. The second most is 323.

Counties with the highest number of recent cases per resident

jbr's picture

University of Wisconsin-Madison restricts student movement

Following a surge of coronavirus cases, the University of Wisconsin-Madison announced Monday that undergraduate students must restrict in-person interactions to “essential activities."

University of Wisconsin-Madison restricts student movement after coronavirus surge

mjw's picture

And what about UT?

1. Rent an entire hotel for quarantine space.

2. Massey Hall Residents being relocated to use the entire dorm as quarantine space.

3. There was a rumor that the Chancellor is meeting with the faculty tonight, so that could mean going online for at least a while, but the post dropped off the UTK subreddit. Still might be true.

fischbobber's picture

Plowman tonight

Chancellor Plowman is due to address the Board of Health during their meeting at 5:00 pm tonight. I’d say this will be an interesting Board of Health meeting. It’s broadcast on YouTube on the Knox County channel.

fischbobber's picture

Plowman tonight

Chancellor Plowman is due to address the Board of Health during their meeting at 5:00 pm tonight. I’d say this will be an interesting Board of Health meeting. It’s broadcast on YouTube on the Knox County channel.

jbr's picture

University of Wisconsin-Madison restricts student movement

Following a surge of coronavirus cases, the University of Wisconsin-Madison announced Monday that undergraduate students must restrict in-person interactions to “essential activities."

University of Wisconsin-Madison restricts student movement after coronavirus surge

jbr's picture

One new death has been recorded every 106 seconds over 7 days

The silver lining? The pace at which the new coronavirus deaths were accumulating was somewhat slower than it was after the first week in August, when one person died of the coronavirus every 80 seconds over a seven-day period.

U.S. closes in on grim pandemic milestone: the 200,000th COVID-19 death

bizgrrl's picture

What's wrong with

What's wrong with people?!?!?

It's obvious some people don't care about others or our society. Disgusting.

jbr's picture

States are torn between saving bars and stopping coronavirus

With America struggling to get the coronavirus under control and Washington deadlocked over new relief measures, states face a difficult choice: open the businesses most likely to spread the coronavirus, especially bars and restaurants, or keep them closed and risk a wave of bankruptcies.

With Washington silent, states are torn between saving bars and stopping coronavirus

Factchecker's picture

Wuut?

...states are torn between saving bars and stopping coronavirus.

In only the neoliberalist catastrophe now known as Trump's America could this not be satire.

bizgrrl's picture

+1

+1

fischbobber's picture

Knoxviews history

All this stuff is coming to light about who knew what in February. As I recall, just concern became an issue on this forum in late February.

I wonder if there's a way to go through archived facebook postings?

Is there a way to cross-reference on this site?

Please pardon me if these are basic, stupid, ignorant questions. I just write and look shit up with a computer, I don't really know how to use one.

R. Neal's picture

Over on the far tight column

Over on the far tight column there are links to search and archives.

bizgrrl's picture

March 6 was the first post

March 6 was the first post about the coronavirus on Knoxviews.

michael kaplan's picture

March 3 Election

We were already taking some precautions at the March 3 election, wiping down machines and washing our hands. One voter who regularly votes on Election Day did not show up, and he reportedly was ill, later diagnosed with COVID-19.

jbr's picture

CDC report links dining out to increased COVID-19 risk

People who tested positive for COVID-19 were more than twice as likely to report eating or drinking at a bar or restaurant in the past two weeks.

"Even if I'm sitting at a table and the food hasn't arrived yet, I still wear a mask. I won't sit at a table that's next to somebody else," Rice said, adding that he also asks to be seated outside.

As states lift restaurant restrictions, CDC report links dining out to increased COVID-19 risk

fischbobber's picture

Found this on Feb. 26

We will have to rebuild a rural/regional Hospital system should pandemics become an issue.

I just did the math and so far this virus has a 3.4% death rate. Figure there's 1500 people working at the City/County building. A year from the time the virus was introduced, 50.6 of those people have deceased. (The .6 is Ellen from accounting. She's hanging in there, but we just don't know if she's going to make it.) 3.4% is a huge death rate.

A lot can happen in between now and November.

I feel like I'm a part of a primary source historical document.

fischbobber's picture

When speaking up for the Board of Health

One takes a lot of abuse these days from people who's education about covid seems to have hit a wall in March. I was curious how far back we went. Trump could not have gotten away with lying like he did about the seriousness of the issue if his followers hadn't been so willfully ignorant.

Thanks Randy and Biz for all you do. This forum has consistently lead the way on coverage of this issue. I'm honored and humbled to be a part of it.

jbr's picture

Teacher departures leave schools scrambling for substitutes amid

With many teachers opting out of returning to the classroom because of the coronavirus, schools around the U.S. are scrambling to find replacements and in some places lowering certification requirements to help get substitutes in the door.

Teacher departures leave schools scrambling for substitutes amid COVID-19

jbr's picture

Coronavirus death toll from Maine wedding rises to 7

The death toll from a coronavirus outbreak linked to an indoor wedding and reception in Maine has risen to seven, with the number of cases connected to the event up to 176.

Coronavirus death toll from Maine wedding rises to 7, with over 175 infected

fischbobber's picture

If Glenn Jacobs doesn't get his cult in order

We'll be at 200 deaths by January. That's the kind of death toll that affects most members of a community our size.

jbr's picture

Florida will reopen bars and restaurants with no restrictions

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced on Friday that Florida, hard hit by coronavirus pandemic this summer, was moving into Phase 3 of reopening, lifting all restrictions on restaurants and businesses.

On Friday, Florida reported 2,541 new Covid-19 infections, bringing the state total to nearly 700,000 total confirmed cases. 177 deaths were recorded on Friday, bringing the cumulative state total to 13,914.

Florida, hard hit by coronavirus this summer, will reopen bars and restaurants with no restrictions

jbr's picture

Beginning this week, the Maps

Beginning this week, the Maps app will display seven-day averages of new Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people. The chosen areas will show if cases are increasing or decreasing and be shaded with one of six colors to signify how many new cases were reported.

Google is pulling data from three sources: Johns Hopkins University, the New York Times, and Wikipedia. They receive their data from the World Health Organization and other public or government health organizations. Information is available for all 220 countries that Google Maps works in.

To use it, open the app, press the layers button (two squares on top of each other) on the top right and press "Covid-19 Info" button. That will reveal the color-coded app showing case counts.

Google updates Maps to show how bad Covid is in your area

fischbobber's picture

Just so we all know what we're talking about,....

Knox County Charter, State Law, and Extracts of Attorney General Opinions on County Boards of Health
Knox County Charter
Sec. 38-33. - County board of health.
(a)There is hereby created a county board of health. It shall have all of the powers and duties as required and provided for by state law.
(b)The director of the department of health shall report to, and work in concert with, the county board of health, in addition to reporting to and working with the county executive.
TCA on Public Health Boards
68-2-601. County board of health — Members — Powers and duties.
f) The powers and duties of county boards of health are to:
(1) Govern the policies of full-time county health departments established in accordance with this chapter;
(2) Through the county health director or the county health officer, or both, enforce such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the commissioner essential to the control of preventable diseases and the promotion and maintenance of the general health of the county;
(3) Adopt rules and regulations as may be necessary or appropriate to protect the general health and safety of the citizens of the county. The regulations shall be at least as stringent as the standard established by a state law or regulation as applicable to the same or similar subject matter. Regulations of a county board of health supersede less stringent or conflicting local ordinances; and
(4) Require that an annual budget be prepared and, when this budget has been approved by the county board of health, submit the same to the county legislative body for consideration and subsequent provision of necessary funds to meet all obligations under the adopted budgets.
68-2-602. Violations of rules and regulations of county board — Penalty.
Any person who violates a county board of health regulation commits a Class C misdemeanor.
68-2-603. Establishment of county health department — County health director — County health officer.
(2) The county health director shall be appointed by the commissioner of health or by the commissioner's designee, act as the administrative officer of the county health department, take actions and make determinations necessary to properly execute the state department of health's programs, and adequately enforce the rules and regulations established by the commissioner and the county board of health.
68-2-609. Orders of county health officer.
The county health officer is empowered to order:
(1) The quarantine of any place or person, if the county health officer finds that quarantine is necessary to protect the public health from an epidemic;
(2) The closure of any public establishment, facility or building if the county health officer finds unsanitary conditions of such a nature and extent to significantly threaten the public health; or
(3) The closure of any public establishment, facility or building, if the county health officer is otherwise authorized by law to take that action.
Attorney General Opinions
Below is an extract of state law from an opinion of the Attorney General on the powers of a local board of health and health department in non-state of emergency situation
The General Assembly has, however, authorized local health departments to adopt regulations more stringent or restrictive than those provided by state law or regulation. Tenn.Code Ann.§68-2-601(f)(3)(authorizing adoption of regulations to “protect the general health and safety of the citizens of the county” that “shall be at least as stringent as the standard established by a state law or regulation as applicable to the same or similar subject matter”). And the Commissioner of the Department of Health, acting under statutory authority to promulgate rules to prevent the spread of disease, Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 68-1-201, 68-5-104, has given local health officers confronted with an epidemic the power—indeed, the obligation—to “[e]stablish appropriate control measures which may include examination, treatment, isolation, quarantine, exclusion, disinfection, immunization, disease surveillance, closure of establishment, education, and other measures considered appropriate by medical experts for the protection of the public’s health.” Tenn.Comp.R.&Regs.1200-14-01-.15. Actions by local health departments under this authority have the force and effect of law in the absence of action by the Governor.
In state of emergencies, below is another extract from an Attorney General opinion in 2020.
The General Assembly has vested the Governor with exclusive responsibility and authority to assume control over all aspects of the State’s response to an emergency such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Tenn.CodeAnn.§58-2-107(a)(1). Because the executive orders that the Governor issues pursuant to that authority have the force and effect of law, Tenn. Code Ann. § 58-2- 107(a)(2), the Governor’s directives in response to an emergency supersede and preempt any action taken by political subdivisions of the State.
Just as the Governor may exercise his authority under Tenn. Code Ann. § 58-2-107(a)(1) to delegate to a local governmental entity or to the local health department “such powers as the governor may deem prudent,” the Governor may exercise his emergency powers to expressly authorize, or recognize the authority of, county health departments to take necessary actions. The Governor’s power to issue these executive orders is grounded in the broad grant of authority—a responsibility and authority that the General Assembly has vested solely in the office of the governor—to assume control over all aspects of the State’s response to an emergency such as the COVID-19 pandemic:
Pertinent here, on May 22, 2020, Governor Lee issued Executive Order 38 whichauthorizes the six counties with locally-run county health departments—i.e., Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, Madison, Shelby, and Sullivan—to issue “additional orders or measures related to the containment or management of the spread of COVID- 19, which may permit to a greater degree, or restrict to a greater degree, the opening, closure, or operation of businesses, organizations, or venues in those counties or the gathering of persons.
Executive Order 54, issued on July 6, 2020, expanded the scope of Executive Order 38 and provides that nothing in Executive Order 38 (or Executive Order 54 itself) preempts or supersedes the authority of bodies in the six counties with locally-run county health departments to issue or enact orders, ordinances, rules, or law to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Thanks to Senator Briggs

fischbobber's picture

924 cases

!0/2/20. This is despite two large downward adjustments to the formula determining active cases over the last month. I believe the metric states 27-47 for a full reopen. The pro-infection (I'm still struggling with figuring out exactly what terminology to use for a group of people attempting to infect unwilling citizens)is insisting that is impossible and we should open without restrictions after disbanding the Board of Health.

These were the same people that applauded the full (underground) opening of the bars May 2 despite restrictions being in place until June. They said then we only had five deaths and face masks violated their rights. Jacobs was warned that deaths would skyrocket as a direct result of his actions. We now have 84 deaths, all statistically correlating with move Jacobs has made that increased the infection rate and undermined mitigation effort. Over 5000 people have viewed an economic pushback measure.

What do we call these people?

fischbobber's picture

Disheartening

I got off late and didn't get to start home until well after eleven. I was kind of looking forward to a Tom Waits'y drive home. I've been taking the same route home since March. I set it up like we set up the acid deposition study in the early nineties. Do the same thing and observe, every night, and see what happens.

It doesn't look like the eleven o'clock curfew as it is being instituted will make a statistical influence. Ironically, the solution to that is to move it back to ten, because it is statistically impossible for this measure to not show up. Somebody is jacking the numbers around. Like maybe the guys keeping their bars open.

We are in a trough. We tend to surge and trough rather regularly. We are getting ready to surge, by how much, is anyone's guess. Our plateau levels between surge and trough keep rising. We can't sustain that.

Honestly, for a capitalist, free market approach to this problem to work, there will be work shutdowns and consumer boycotts. Our consumer market isn't making its voice heard, and when they do, the market will adjust.

jbr's picture

So restaurants/bars can seat

So restaurants/bars can seat folks at bar now?

At Texas Roadhouse in Kingston Pike and they are seating at bar.

fischbobber's picture

There are no rules.

Nothing is being enforced. Unless you take it upon yourself to know exactly what's going on, you're best to stay home.

On that note, if Hen and Hoc is inconvenient, the Holy Hombeg trifecta, Hollie's Gourmet Market, Willies Butcher Shop and the Shrimp Dock will prepare to order. Stuff like this works really well once a routine is set. This town's covid policy is every man for himself. I'm going to work on providing sanctuary consumer sites for a while. Or at least add that to the reporting repertoire.

fischbobber's picture

One week later

Working the Holy Homburg Trifecta this weekend. I think the town will be dependent on the various suburbs to keep our covid numbers down. Old City and downtown were shutting down or shut down around 11:30. I not only thought it was encouraging, but could observe dispersal behavior to see how this worked.

The Strip was a work in progress when I went through. That being said, that is the business community that shut this problem down and made football happen, at all and for all. There are problems, but this town owes the three high volume nightspots, that have been working toward a solution a huge debt of gratitude. Hopefully game days will make up for your effort. Use masks. Sell masks. Have a smart plan.

Sunday, Monday and Tuesday numbers should tell the tale of the next month.

fischbobber's picture

South Carolina Numbers

The South Carolina spike showed today, right on time. Could have been worse, we needed it to be better. We have our work cut out for us.

County commission bump is next. That should show in the next three days. The thing is, that first commission number Sunday should also have a secondary influence from the game.

I find my mind wandering back to High School math classes and listening to people cry, "What are we ever gonna use this for?" and then I look at these statistics I'm trying to learn how to pattern and I think, I wish I'd have listened closer and applied myself more in my math and statistics classes.

jbr's picture

Google map of Covid-19

jbr's picture

Restaurants find creative winter outdoor dining solutions, but e

Restaurants across the U.S. are using tents, bubbles and more to keep diners comfortable as temperatures drop. Experts caution that more walls mean greater risk for Covid-19 spread, and say heat lamps are likely the safest option.

Restaurants find creative winter outdoor dining solutions, but experts cite concerns

jbr's picture

Delta adds 460 passengers who refused masks to 'no-fly' list

Nice work Delta

In a letter to Delta employees Thursday, CEO Ed Bastian said that 460 customers who refused to wear face coverings amid the coronavirus pandemic were added to the airline's "no-fly list."

Delta adds 460 passengers who refused masks to 'no-fly' list

jbr's picture

People with Down syndrome have 10 times the risk of death

People with Down syndrome have 10 times the risk of dying from Covid-19 compared to those without the disability, a team of researchers reported Thursday.

They also found a fourfold increased risk of coronavirus-related hospitalizations for those with Down syndrome, "a group that is not currently strategically protected," according to the report in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

People with Down syndrome have 10 times the risk of death from Covid-19 as those without, study finds

COVID-19 Mortality Risk in Down Syndrome: Results From a Cohort Study Of 8 Million Adults

fischbobber's picture

Sunday, October 25, 2020

The 100th death occurred from covid-19 in Knox County. Monday night, we will hear Debbi, the nurse from Halls explain why this is a hoax and why we should ignore the experts and listen to her because she is a nurse or some sort of health professional. There is a reason the 37918 zip code continues to expand in cases faster than anywhere else in Knox County.

jbr's picture

Maryland Voter Arrested After Refusing To Wear Mask

He must have a lot of free time

The Harford County Board of Elections has a designated area for voters who are unable or unwilling to wear a mask while voting.

Maryland Voter Arrested After Refusing To Wear Mask At Polling Location In Harford County, Police Say

jbr's picture

Sisters charged for allegedly stabbing security guard over masks

Two sisters are being held on attempted first-degree murder charges in Illinois for allegedly stabbing a store security guard after being told they needed to wear a mask and use hand sanitizer.

Their argument became physical when Jessica Hill, 21, pulled out a knife and stabbed him in his back, neck, and arms 27 times, according to the criminal complaint.

Her sister, 18-year-old Jayla Hill, held the victim down by his hair while the attack occurred, according to the complaint.

Sisters charged for allegedly stabbing store security guard 27 times after he told them to wear a mask

jbr's picture

Record day COVID-19-related deaths in TN; Blount County 5 more

On a day that saw record high deaths from COVID-19 complications, the virus also hit East Tennessee hard.

Blount County saw five new deaths Friday from the virus, bringing its total to 41.

Record day for COVID-19-related deaths in TN; Blount County sees 5 more

jbr's picture

US just reported 102,831 new Covid-19 infections in 1 day

The US just reported 102,831 new Covid-19 infections in 1 day. That's an all-time high

The US just reported 102,831 new Covid-19 infections in 1 day. That's an all-time high

fischbobber's picture

But I thought......

All the Trump supporters said this would all go away in November 4. How can this be?

bizgrrl's picture

Yeah. Guess they lied again.

Yeah. Guess they lied again.

fischbobber's picture

I'm shocked.

Shocked I say. Is nothing sacred?

jbr's picture

Clots, Strokes, Rashes. Is COVID-19 A Disease Of Blood Vessels?

Some of the earliest insights into how COVID-19 can act like a vascular disease came from studying the aftermath of the most serious infections. Those reveal that the virus warps a critical piece of our vascular infrastructure: the single layer of cells lining the inside of every blood vessel, known as the endothelial cells or simply the endothelium.

Clots, Strokes And Rashes. Is COVID-19 A Disease Of The Blood Vessels?

jbr's picture

Saturday, there were 126,742 new coronavirus cases

On Saturday, there were 126,742 new coronavirus cases, according to Johns Hopkins University. The record marked the fourth day last week that new cases totaled more than 100,000 and the third day in a row that new cases topped more than 120,000, according to a CNN analysis.

US has hit the highest daily number of new cases since the pandemic began

U.S. Hits New Coronavirus Case Record for Third Straight Day

jbr's picture

Texas just became the first US state to hit 1 million cases

The Lone Star State has now identified 1,010,364 Covid-19 cases since the pandemic began. At least 19,337 people there have died...

Texas just became the first US state to hit 1 million cases of Covid-19

fischbobber's picture

Knoxville running out of covid icu capability

jbr's picture

Over 1 million US children have been diagnosed with Covid-19

"As of Nov. 12, a total of 1,039,464 children have tested positive for Covid-19 since the onset of the pandemic. In the one-week period ending Nov. 12, there were 111,946 new cases in children, which is substantially larger than any previous week in the pandemic," the groups said in a joint statement.

Over 1 million US children have been diagnosed with Covid-19, pediatricians say

jbr's picture

Nurse: Patients test positive refuse to believe they have Covid

Jodi Doering, a nurse from South Dakota who says some of her coronavirus patients often don't want to believe that Covid-19 is real, even in their dying moments

Nurse: Some patients who test positive refuse to believe they have Covid-19

jbr's picture

Elderly people are dying from isolation

More than eight months into the pandemic, the very isolation that is meant to protect nursing home residents from Covid-19 is also contributing to their deaths. Confined to their rooms and largely cut off from visitors, many residents are experiencing serious mental and physical decline. Three women stand up to fight for leniency in New York state visitation policies, in the hopes of saving their loved ones.

The hidden Covid-19 crisis: Elderly people are dying from isolation

fischbobber's picture

Seems like..

Why can't folks help the residents use Zoom? Or take them to the lobby to wave at folks who've come to visit? Maybe we could hire some folks to test out ways of solving this problem. As long as the tests are promised and shown to do no harm, they should proceed to the betterment of all.

It sounds like covid isn't causing as many problems as it's exposing.

bizgrrl's picture

So sad. I feel for hospital

So sad. I feel for hospital workers, all essential workers, that they have to work in environments where so many people don't care about others, especially the others that work hard to serve us all.

jbr's picture

CDC:Most coronavirus cases are spread by people without symptoms

It's one of the main reasons mask use is so important, the CDC said.

"CDC and others estimate that more than 50% of all infections are transmitted from people who are not exhibiting symptoms," it added in the guidance posted Friday.

Most coronavirus cases are spread by people without symptoms, CDC now says

jbr's picture

Covid-19 outbreaks in nursing homes hit record high

More than 1,300 nursing homes across the U.S. reported having three or more confirmed Covid-19 cases during the first week of November — the highest number ever reported in a single week, according to an NBC News analysis of federal data. The figure does not include outbreaks at assisted living facilities, which the federal government does not track.

Covid-19 outbreaks in nursing homes hit record high

bizgrrl's picture

I really wonder about this

I really wonder about this problem. Are the places not following guidelines? Or, are they not insisting the employees be careful? So sad.

Oh, Tennessee tracks assisted living center cases, or at least they used to.

mjw's picture

Congregate care

My 95 year old aunt lives in a retirement center in town (not a nursing home or assisted living). They sent out a notice this week about Thanksgiving that basically said "we continue our policy that denies entrance to our facility for anyone who doesn't work or live there, we have discontinued our outdoor visitation option due to the high rate of COVID, and we are begging you not to go have Thanksgiving with your family, but we can't mandate anything."

The state of Tennessee has not given them any power to say, "you can leave, but you can't come back" or "you can leave, but we're going to stick you in quarantine when you get back" or any other version of "you can't leave", so God knows what will happen after Thanksgiving. Nursing homes and assisted living facilities have a bit more leeway to prevent their patients from leaving.

I'll also point out that the people who work in nursing homes are often some of the most overworked, underpaid people in our society. Which limits their living options. Which means they are often people of color, who as we know have been much more likely to catch COVID, for various reasons. Which means that staff is a vector for COVID into nursing homes and other congregate care facilities, no matter how careful they are.

bizgrrl's picture

You just make some important

You just make some important points.

I've dealt with a few different nursing homes. I agree the employees are underpaid. However, I also know some nursing homes do a much better job than others.

fischbobber's picture

As cases and community density of cases go up......

Wouldn't it just be more likely for an active case to vector into an assisted living facility via their staff? It seems on of the more insidious aspects of covid is its asymptomatic transmission. I haven't seen the documentation, but I figured that was happening.

fischbobber's picture

I wonder......

(link...)

Does this mean Glenn Jacob's cult various assaults on innocent citizens activities are now constitutionally protected? How long until they declare themselves a religion?

fischbobber's picture

Almost forgot.

Happy Thanksgiving.

(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

An all time favorite.

An all time favorite.

fischbobber's picture

Update

(link...)

We're all getting old. Some of our Mayor's are doing their damnedest to speed our demise. Kinda sad.

BoB W.'s picture

27 8x10 color glossys - oh my!

I usually listen to this every year around Thanksgiving, but had forgotten to this year. Thanks for the reminder! There's nothing like a good old-fashioned war protest song to get my blood pumping.

Stay away from Obie!

jbr's picture

Coronavirus stable for hours on surfaces

The scientists found that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. The results provide key information about the stability of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19 disease, and suggests that people may acquire the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects.

New coronavirus stable for hours on surfaces

jmcnair's picture

That was the thought in March

Here's a newer article from The Lancet:

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanres/article/PIIS2213-2600(20)30514-2/fulltext

"However, latest research suggests that this is unlikely to be a major route of transmission as although SARS-CoV-2 can persist for days on inanimate surfaces, attempts to culture the virus from these surfaces were unsuccessful."

bizgrrl's picture

Thanks. I thought there was

Thanks. I thought there was some updated information. This is all so new. Much of the information changes and it can be hard to keep up. Have to look at the dates of articles.

fischbobber's picture

More bits and pieces

(link...)

Slowly but surely we're adding to our body of knowledge.

jbr's picture

US reports 3,100 plus coronavirus deaths, single day record

The U.S. reported 3,157 deaths from COVID-19 Wednesday, by far the most for any one day in the pandemic. It comes as a record number of people are hospitalized or in intensive care.

Wednesday's death toll, according to data by Johns Hopkins University, is about 20% higher than the previous record of 2,607 deaths recorded on April 15. More than 5,700 COVID-19 deaths have been reported by JHU over the past two days.

US reports more than 3,100 coronavirus deaths, shattering single-day record

jbr's picture

Rudy Giuliani tests positive for COVID

President Donald Trump says his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani has tested positive for coronavirus.

Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani tests positive for COVID

jbr's picture

Margaret Keenan, 90, first person in world to receive vaccine

LONDON — At 6.31 a.m. on Tuesday, 334 days after the first reported Covid-19 death in China, Margaret Keenan, 90, became the first person in the world to receive a clinically approved vaccine.

First in line will be anyone over the age of 80 who is already in hospital.

Britain becomes first to roll out clinically approved BioNTech-Pfizer vaccine

Factchecker's picture

The Taming of the Flu

And in the You Can't Make This Stuff Up department, the second vaccine recipient was William Shakespeare.

(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

Ya gotta love the Brits.

Ya gotta love the Brits.

JaHu's picture

This literally pisses me off

This literally pisses me off about our state leaders.
The Texas secretary of state is trying to overturn elections in Georgia, Michigan, Pennslvania and Wisconsin in hopes that Trump will grant him a pardon from the alleged crimes he's committed if he can help keep Trump in office. I think it's a crime that our state is supporting this crook. This is literally a destruction of our democracy being assisted by our state leaders

(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

It's a coup. Arrest them for

It's a coup. Arrest them for treason.

JaHu's picture

This should really piss off

This should really piss off everyone in Tennessee who voted by mail because our state Attorney General is basically saying that he doesn't believe your vote should count just because you felt, for public safety and yours, that you chose to vote by mail. It not only should tick off the ones who voted by mail but also family members who may have voted in person but have elderly who needed to vote by mail because of the dangerous risk to their health and lives of in person voting.

JaHu's picture

Hunter Biden Now Under FBI Probe

Why is the FBI doing this now and not waiting til after Biden has been inaugurated? It's like throwing gas on a fire. It's just one more thing Trump and his supporters are going to use to say the election should be overturned. It reminds me of when James Comey brought up Hillary's emails right before the 2016 election which ended up being baseless nonsense that cost her the election.

"Activity in the investigation had gone covert in recent months due to Justice Department guidelines prohibiting overt actions that could affect an election"

To me then, this investigation is illegal because Biden isn't officially in office yet.

(link...)

jbr's picture

Tennessee pastor: Covid-19 is not a pandemic

Mt. Juliet is in Wilson County, to the east of Nashville. And like other more rural areas across the country, it's seeing a surge in coronavirus cases.

Vaccines on horizon as virus surges through Trump country. And the political debate is as heated as ever

bizgrrl's picture

Deplorable.

Deplorable.

JaHu's picture

Do you have Christmas

Do you have Christmas packages that are delayed in shipping? I do one was mailed from Atlanta and sent to Memphis where it's been sitting idle at a USPS warehouse for five days. Memphis??? When Atlanta is only three hours away?
Just keep this in mind, these delays were brought to you by Trump and DeJoy his appointed Postmaster General in their alledged ongoing sabotage of the US Postal Service.

And by the way, Christmas presents bought online shouldn't be counted as real Christmas presents because they were sent by mail and Texas doesn't believe the rules should be changed about how gifts are given.

bizgrrl's picture

Haven't had any packages

Haven't had any packages delayed.

Have noticed in our area the mail was running late, but ok now. The postal package deliveries have been coming morning, noon, and night, even on Sundays. They are very busy.

JaHu's picture

I have three delayed during

I have three delayed during shipment from two different sources. I must have ticked off the Postal service. :)

I've noticed I've really become very bitter throughout this whole Trump presidency fiasco.

fischbobber's picture

On being bitter....

That is a brilliant observation. I’ve noticed the same about myself. As I struggle to find ways to describe the willful killing of one’s fellow man via a novel method, I struggled to find the words to describe what a group of those folks would be called and how to refer to their actions. I find that describing these situations with words suited for a multi-generational diner gathering don’t adequately describe the absolute depravity of what’s happening, and the words that capture that depravity seem to spark outrage from those that insist we keep public discourse on the subject of killing our fellow man in cold blood for no real reason civil. What’s civil about 208 dead people killed by a policy deliberately instituted with the knowledge that the result would be those deaths? I’m losing patience with the human race in general.

What words should I be using? I’m sheltering in place. Get off my lawn.

JaHu's picture

Agreed!!! And I don't

Agreed!!! And I don't understand why a huge, maybe not majority, but many people don't seem to be able to comprehend this.

bizgrrl's picture

Get off my lawn. Hah!

Get off my lawn.

Hah!

JaHu's picture

By the way, I don't blame the

By the way, I don't blame the Postal carriers or the people who work in the local post offices or distribution centers, I'm certain they are being overworked. I blame the top dogs or dog who's running the USPS for making it harder, not easier for them to do their jobs.

JaHu's picture

When the Proud Boys and other

When the Proud Boys and other Trump supporting protesters commit acts of violence to try to overturn the election? Are they or are they not committing treason? Until somehow the election is overturned in court, which at this juncture, is highly unlikely. Any person committing a violent act against someone who is defending Biden's win is committing a treasonous act against our constitution. We are a country of laws and the constitution is our highest law. And if a person committing the violence a member of a group, doesn't this mean the group is in essence declaring war on our democracy?
Just asking.

fischbobber's picture

Insurrection

Now that violence has ensued, according to the 14th amendment, Tim should be disqualified from serving in elected office for his willful participation in an insurrection. I’m not sure of the procedure, or if there even is an established procedure, or if legal definitions always run lockstep with standard English dictionary definitions, but if we use Tim’s “Aw shucks, common man common sense standard” he shouldn’t be seated.

jbr's picture

Covid patients may need heart screening before exercising again

... for competitive sports athletes, high school athletes and recreational "masters athletes" — that is, people over age 35 who train for or participate in running, swimming, cycling, weightlifting or other competitions designed for adults in their age category.

Overall, the recommendations endorse physician consultations and heart screenings — using electrocardiograms, echocardiograms and troponin blood tests — for athletes who had moderate to severe Covid-19. Heart screening isn't recommended for people who had cases that were asymptomatic or mild.

“Cardiac injury is quite common and prevalent among sicker patients who are hospitalized with Covid-19 infection, upwards of 20 percent prevalence of cardiac injury," said Dr. Jonathan Kim, chief of sports cardiology at Emory University in Atlanta ...

Some recovered Covid patients may need heart screening before exercising again

jbr's picture

France's Emmanuel Macron tests positive for Covid-19

French President Emmanuel Macron has tested positive for Covid-19 after experiencing symptoms and will self-isolate for a week, his office said Thursday,

France's Emmanuel Macron tests positive for Covid-19, sending other European leaders into quarantine

JaHu's picture

Current shipping situation.I

Current shipping situation.
I ordered a small item on the 3rd of December which was being shipped from Atlanta. From there it was shipped to Memphis which is farther away, where it sat for 12 days. It is currently sitting in Tallahassee Florida which is even farther away. Luckily it's not a Christmas gift but I had planed to use it for Christmas.

Thanks Dejoy for making our postal service better.

Makes one wonder if there could be millions more Biden votes floating around out there?

JaHu's picture

Fingers crossed! The item I

Fingers crossed!
The item I ordered online might get to visit almost as many cities as Santa. Each update, it gets farther and farther away. I'm thinking LA on the next update. Then who knows, maybe Hong Kong. Or maybe the North Pole and into Santa's bag and maybe he'll drop it off during his round.

I'll be sure to put out milk and cookies just in case.

I'm not putting any of the blame of this on the postal workers. They have to be extremely overworked. First due to the pandemic forcing more people to buy online, and then capped off by the Christmas season probably quadrupling their normal loads. The cutbacks put in place by the current administration has done almost irreparable damage to this national institution. I hope when Biden takes office he will attempt to reverse the damage that has been done to the postal service.

Be sure to remember your postal workers this season to show that you do appreciate them.

bizgrrl's picture

I think it is sort of lost,

I think it is sort of lost, but trackable. Should be interesting if you ever receive it.

How do you remember a postal worker? I remember many years ago my Mother would leave them little packages. What is done in this century?

JaHu's picture

I don't know if is kosher

I don't know if it is kosher during this pandemic, or even legal, but I have left the carrier a tip with a thank you note. I consider them front line workers and deserve more pay.

I had one gift that I ordered that was supposed to be delivered to me, but was instead, delivered to an address in Murfreesboro. Don't quite understand that one? But I think the people who I ordered the gift through, somehow put the wrong address on it.

Treehouse's picture

Cookies

I gave a couple oatmeal-chocolate chip-raisin cookies I made to my postal carrier today.

Midori Barstow's picture

How do you remember a postal worker?

I buy postal worker greeting cards from online card shop
and enclose crisp disinfected $20 bill.

I always receive an official looking
usps thank you card/receipt in return.

.............

$20
“Under these federal regulations, carriers are permitted to accept a gift worth $20 or less from a customer per occasion, such as Christmas,” it states on the USPS website.

“However, cash and cash equivalents, such as checks or gift cards that can be exchanged for cash, must never be accepted in any amount.

JaHu's picture

Package update!

The little item I ordered, is probably in a box approximately two or three inches wide and maybe five or six inches tall. It has gone from Atlanta, which is only 200 miles away, to Memphis to Tallahassee and now to Oxford Mississippi which is not far below Memphis. By air, it is closer to Knoxville but by truck it is farther than Memphis or Tallahassee and definitely farther than Atlanta. I estimate that this beautiful little bouncing box of bits has traveled over 1700 miles so far and still isn't close to reaching its destination. Imagine the fuel spent on this delivery.

The delivery of this item is no longer priority to me, I've since replaced it with one I purchased from a store. As the old saying goes, reaching the final destination isn't as enjoyable as the journey itself.

JaHu's picture

I personally have to commend

I personally have to commend the USPS for their effort to get presents delivered before Christmas. All of my packages, other than the little one that is on tour of the Eastern United States, have arrived, or is at least out for delivery. I even have one that wasn't even scheduled to arrive before the first of the year, appears to be arriving before Christmas.

fischbobber's picture

Deliveries 2020

I can’t speak for the Post Office as their management issues are the stuff nightmares (particularly for delivery people) are made of, but I can say that for the industry in general, this year presented quite the unique set of challenges. As I sit on Christmas Eve eve, I can say that due to a lot of effort, a lot of luck and an economic downturn that appears to be more than Wall Street thinks it is, we have, as an industrial sector, made it through this peak admirably. There will be outlier anecdotes about double labeled packages going back and forth across America, there always are, but overall, I’m pretty proud to be a part of this industry and think we performed beyond what we would have reasonably expected.

Now we need to get the next two days done and get ready for 2021.

bizgrrl's picture

"we have, as an industrial

"we have, as an industrial sector, made it through this peak admirably. There will be outlier anecdotes about double labeled packages going back and forth across America, there always are, but overall, I’m pretty proud to be a part of this industry and think we performed beyond what we would have reasonably expected."

I agree. Thanks to you and the many others helping the rest of us survive.

jbr's picture

Top 20 cities where COVID-19 is growing at fast rates

The New York Times has a COVID-19 tracking site, which lists the top 20 cities where COVID-19 is growing at fast rates. Almost half of the cities listed are located in Tennessee.

-No. 3 Sevierville

-No. 6 Cleveland

-No. 7 Athens

-No. 8 Tullahoma

-No. 9 Greeneville

-No. 11 Crossville

-No. 12 Morristown

-No. 17 Cookeville

-No. 18 Nashville

-No. 19 Johnson City

Tenn. identified as worst location in the nation for COVID-19 infections

bizgrrl's picture

Sheesh. So proud. Not.

Sheesh. So proud. Not.

Joe328's picture

Knoxville is Number One in

Knoxville is Number One in the nation with a positive rate of 35%. Number two is a city in California with a positive rate of 20%.

bizgrrl's picture

I do believe that is for the

I do believe that is for the metro area.

Yes, it does look like metro area of over 869,000 citizens.

Nashville metro area is 3rd in the cities with over 1,000 000 citizens.

Joe328's picture

I believe Knoxville is

I believe Knoxville is distorting data being reported to the public. Until about three weeks ago, Knox County Health Dept reported data on hospital rooms, ventilators, ICU beds, and other information was reported as Knox County data only. When room availability started dropping, Knox County reported the data in the Metro Area. They defined the Metro Area as all 16 counties in East Tennessee. Which includes Chattanooga, Bristol, and west to Crossville.

JaHu's picture

Trump has now pardoned four

Trump has now pardoned four Blackwater security guards jailed for the mas killing of 14 Iraqi civilians which included 2 children in Bagdad in 2007.
Why would he do this? Is he trying to build his own personal army? Or is he at least planning to use them as hit men to threaten lawmakers to go along with his crazy scheme for a coup attempt of the US government? Did he pardon them knowing these guys will now be grateful and loyal? One was in jail for life, the others had 30 year prison sentences. What do they have to lose? And Trump knows committing atrocities are not beneath them. The US Military must keep a watchful eye on these four after their release.

jbr's picture

Knoxville mother pleads with people to wear mask

A mother is pleading with the community to wear a mask after her son died from COVID-19 a week before Christmas.

‘It’s so simple,’ Knoxville mother pleads the community wear masks after son dies from COVID-19

fischbobber's picture

After phase two

The Emory Ingles was my go to for a while. It was right before closing, the store was empty save for a few people and masking was observed. The young men at the front were great about making sure they were properly masked, the female manager and assistant manager at least paid cursory attention to their mask usage, but they clearly weren't into it.

I quit using that Ingles after the unmasked began showing up. My last night involved a woman who wore a mask into the store, took off her mask, and planted her derriere in the wine beer section for twenty minutes, browsing. While giving her her space, I had to move twice to keep 20 ft of distance between two other unmasked shoppers and had another unmasked shopper darn near run me over as I headed to checkout. When I said something to the manager she said they weren't going to do anything about it, so I haven't been back. It wouldn't surprise me if their neglect and lack of enforcement of public sanitation and health laws, including the mask mandate lead directly to this young man's death.

This is why limiting a stores liability and denying citizens the right to just compensation for their loss is a bad idea. Ingles shouldn't have the power to select to arbitrarily kill random employees, just to take care of their minority of criminal customers. Do not let the legislature take away our constitutional right to sue and receive just compensation for our losses.

fischbobber's picture

Billiards and Brews

(link...)

This place has been cited seven times for violating the 10:00 curfew. But there's no need for the Sheriff to participate in enforcement. The customers will take care of it.

jbr's picture

Newest amenity at hotels? Covid-19 test at check-in ...

The tests are usually offered in partnership with a local laboratory or medical company, and for the most part are at the guest’s own expense. Now that a negative Covid test is required for crossing so many state and country borders, hotels hoping to stand out are adding medical testing to their list of amenities.

Newest amenity at hotels? Covid-19 test at check-in or before your flight

Joe328's picture

This bar is in the City of

This bar is in the City of Knoxville and enforcement should be the responsibility Knoxville's mayor and City Council.

fischbobber's picture

Agred.

And noted.

Perhaps the sheriff could consider enforcing the law in the county. It is the job he was elected to do.

JaHu's picture

Fun Fact

The US Federal budget for the whole fiscal year of 2020 was set at roughly $4.8 trillion. Which is almost the same as the 5.9 trillion miles light travels in a year. Thats a little over $1 for each mile light travels. Which has nothing to do with anything other than geez that's a lot of money.
I guess you could say the US spends dollars at the speed of light

jbr's picture

Covid variant found in

jbr's picture

WHO approves Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for developing nations

But the green light from the World Health Organization (WHO) means countries without their own regulatory bodies, or the means to rigorously assess the efficacy and safety of vaccines, can expedite their own approval processes and begin rolling out vaccination programs.

In a statement Thursday, the WHO said organizations like UNICEF and the Pan-American Health Organization could now procure the vaccine for distribution to countries in need.

WHO approves Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in breakthrough for developing nations

JaHu's picture

Rep-elect on Trump's

Rep-elect on Trump's Electoral College challenge: 'There's no question in my mind that I think he(Trump) won'

There's a huge difference between thinking and knowing! And these politicians who only think Trump won without actually knowing he won, is destroying our democracy.

JaHu's picture

Funniest thing I've seen

Funniest thing I've seen today.
I was reading an article on CNN about Josh Hawley, the Missouri Senator who jumped on board the Trump election coup train, and his picture was having trouble loading onto the page. The spinning loading icon was positioned right over his nose and it was brown which I thought was very appropriate.
I even question if CNN was doing it on purpose.

fischbobber's picture

Who is this Upchurch guy?

Why are they letting him host a superspreader event at Cotton Eyed Joes?

JaHu's picture

I think the F*ck Biden mask

I think the F*ck Biden mask one of the guys with CEJ's posted on IG, explains a lot.

jbr's picture

One American dies from Covid-19 every 33 seconds

Over the past week, the US has averaged 2,637 coronavirus deaths every day, according to Johns Hopkins University.

That's an average of one Covid-19 death every 33 seconds.

One American dies from Covid-19 every 33 seconds as the vaccine rollout hits snags

JaHu's picture

Concern of Trump's Final Days

The concern now is what Trump will do in his final days in the whitehouse? I've heard he still has control of our nuclear arsonal.
I'm curious if there's a way for our lawmakers to completely cut the electrical power to the whitehouse. And I mean all power! And somehow transfer the nuclear codes to Pence? Although, I don't want Trump having access, someone needs to have control or it could leave our nation vulnerable in these waning moments before the inauguration.

bizgrrl's picture

It's a bit of a scary

It's a bit of a scary situation indeed.

jbr's picture

Considering the information

Considering the information he has been given as president over course of presidency, that is a concern. Also those people he brought in as Cabinet and other staff and advisors. They have information that it carries with it a responsibility from now on.

JaHu's picture

This is the sole reason

This is the sole reason anyone involved with the whitehouse has to go through a strict security clearance. Who knows what top secret information that has been tossed around?

jbr's picture

Congressman Chuck Fleischmann tests positive for COVID-19

U.S. Representative Chuck Fleischmann (R-Tenn.) announced he has tested positive for COVID-19 on Sunday, Jan. 10.

In a statement, Fleischmann said he has been in quarantine since Wednesday night when he learned another member of Congress, with whom he shares a residence in DC, had tested positive.

Congressman Chuck Fleischmann tests positive for COVID-19

jbr's picture

Yelp will tell you if local businesses are enforcing masks

The crowd-sourced review platform is expanding its Covid-19 section on profile pages to include information about enforcement of social distancing and if staff are wearing masks with new indicators activated by user reports. Yelp said Tuesday that the changes aim to "instill confidence in consumers to continue supporting local businesses."

Yelp will tell you if local businesses are enforcing masks and social distancing

jbr's picture

1 person dies every 6 minutes in L.A. of Covid

In Los Angeles County, 10 people on average test positive for the coronavirus every minute. Every six minutes, someone dies from Covid-19, according to county public health data.

1 person dies every 6 minutes: How L.A. became the nation's largest coronavirus hot spot

Mike Daugherty's picture

All the selfish people that

All the selfish people that refuse to wear masks, including the ignorant and disgraceful members of Congress, deserve to be isolated and locked up until the end of this terrible pandemic. Exposing others by their selfish action is certainly the un-Christian and mindless thing to do. It is a contradiction of what Jesus taught for many of these people who claim to be Christians. What a twisted group of people that only think of themselves and have such disregard for life.

jbr's picture

Monoclonal antibodies could ease record Covid hospitalizations.

A drug that could protect high-risk Covid-19 patients from developing severe illness is sitting on shelves unused as a record number of people are hospitalized in the U.S.

Monoclonal antibodies are lab-made drugs meant to mimic natural antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. They're recommended for people who are at high risk of getting very sick from the virus, including anyone over age 65 and people with underlying health conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies could ease record Covid hospitalizations. Why are they going unused?

fischbobber's picture

I suspect

Based on what I'm seeing at these meetings, the regulations, the Board's problem solving acumen, the daily numbers and big picture numbers (clue one in this mystery. Glenn Jacobs drives this county's covid numbers.) I'd say part of the reason for stabilization of our local measuring covid statistics is that is that the Board of Health has been issuing solid policy for six months, and we've been getting better as a community, in at least the spirit if not the letter of the law, at following and making this a high profile issue in our efforts for positive economic expansions for Knox County businesses.

As a result, I am going to advance a theory that we're seeing a lot of difficult little things done well, and that is playing into our present stable statistics. My immediate thought upon reading this was, "Hmm. I bet we're using them here."

Board of Health regulations are, by law, minimum standards. County Commission has the option of addressing covid regulations at the legislative level, strengthen them to where they make an immediate effect, and institute means of enforcement. Which needs to happen. But, they won't do that.

JaHu's picture

UT Athletics just fired Head

UT Athletics just fired Head football coach Jeremy Pruitt.
I wonder if he'll send in a lot of rioting thugs to try and overturn that decision?

Update: Fulmer has resigned. I thoroughly hate this.

JaHu's picture

Wyoming Chair is talking

Wyoming Chair is talking secession If Trump is impeached. If Wyoming wants out, I say, fine! Let em out! Put border agents all the away around their state and don't allow them to fly over US air space. I say why wait? Go ahead and do it. I'm tired of all this bull.

bizgrrl's picture

Exactly! I'm pretty sure

Exactly! I'm pretty sure they'll think twice.

JaHu's picture

I'm not sure these right

I'm not sure these right wingnuts are capable of rational thinking. Or thinking for themselves.

R. Neal's picture

I read that they said they

I read that they said they were pretty self sufficient. Cool. Cut off internet, phones, cable tv, medications, air space, interstate commerce (including McDonalds and Wendy's) FDIC protected banking, all federal funding, national guard, etc. etc. Looking forward to seeing their massive army, navy and air force.

JaHu's picture

Can you believe it, that

Can you believe it, that these are some of the state's leaders of their state saying this? This country is dealing with two dangerous viruses. Fingers crossed, hopefully Biden will be able to eradicate both.

JaHu's picture

Smokers and pregnant women

Smokers and pregnant women have been moved to the top of the order in Pennsylvania to be vaccinated. So if you are male in PA, I don't think you will be getting pregnant anytime soon so maybe you should consider taking up smoking.

jbr's picture

Customer accused of attacking Washington grocery store employee

"When the suspect approached the checkout stand, an employee refused to sell the approximate $15 worth of merchandise to the man," the sheriff's office said. "He became irate, and an argument ensued."

Customer accused of attacking Washington grocery store employee after mask dispute

JaHu's picture

Today is the 21st day of the

Today is the 21st day of the 21st year of the 21st century.

jbr's picture

How long it could take to vaccinate all the adults in the US

In the past seven days, about 914,000 doses have been administered daily. If vaccination continues at this same rate, every adult in the US could be fully vaccinated by summer 2022, according to a CNN analysis.

If vaccination picks up to 1 million shots per day, in line with Biden's promise, that timeline could bump up to spring 2022.

Assuming three-quarters of US adults must be fully vaccinated to achieve herd immunity, the US could reach this threshold by February 2022 if vaccination continues at the same rate as the past seven days -- about 914,000 doses administered daily, according to a CNN analysis.

If vaccination picks up to 1 million shots per day, herd immunity in the US could be reached by the end of 2021.

This is how long it could take to vaccinate all the adults in the US against Covid-19

jbr's picture

New COVID-19 strain found in Tennessee

TDH Director Dr. Lisa Piercey said Friday, while they believe the strain will become more dominant due to it being more contagious, they do not believe it is "that big of a deal" -- saying this mutation was inevitable. Piercey believes this strain will become the dominant strain across the state, possibly as early as March, due to it being more easily transmitted.

New COVID-19 strain found in Tennessee, health leaders believe it will become the dominant strain by March

bizgrrl's picture

Even more reason for a mask

Even more reason for a mask mandate. But, noooo...

Believe it is time to get serious about masks for everyone. Noticed at the inauguration and White House press briefings people are wearing two masks, N95 or KN95 and cloth. I haven't found anywhere to purchase an N95 mask.

Moon's picture

KN95s

This link includes a list of KN95 masks that have received emergency use authorization from the FDA. Many of these KNs are plentiful on Amazon.

(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

Thanks. It is really hard to

Thanks. It is really hard to match up a mask from the list to one available for purchase. I was able to buy some KN95 masks from Lowes. However, the mfg is not on the list. I'd really like some N95 masks but they are hard to find.

JaHu's picture

Thanks! Just ordered some.

Thanks! Just ordered some.

jbr's picture

N95 masks

Some experts like Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School physician Dr. Abraar Karan have been advocating for public use of N95 masks from the start of the pandemic. In an interview with CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Karan outlined why N95s are critical at this stage of the pandemic.

"If for four weeks the country essentially wore these masks in those risky settings like that indoors, what kind of difference do you think it would make?" Gupta asked.

"This would stop the epidemic," Karan responded.

The face mask that could end the pandemic

JaHu's picture

The real reason they were

The real reason they were wearing masks, they were hiding their lizard tongues. And for all you people out there who believe in this nonsense, I WAS KIDDING!!!
Thanks Bizgrrl for the tip on the masks. I noticed my dentist and her assistants wearing them but thought you had to be in the medical industry to get them.

jbr's picture

See expert's plan to end pandemic in four weeks

The combination of mask, etc. and flu vaccine has dropped flu infection ~95% from just vaccine only. It seems there can be a similar impact on Covid. Now that Federal government requires masks on federal property/buildings, states, counties and cities should follow suit.

See expert's plan to end pandemic in four weeks

jbr's picture

What do coronavirus variants mean for your masks?

The new variants "may lead people who have them to have a higher amount of virus in their nose, in their mouth, so that when they breathe or talk or cough or sing, they may put more viral particles out in the environment than the average person," she said.

But, Sexton added, "that should not be a huge problem if everybody has a mask on."

If worn correctly, face coverings are expected to help prevent the spread of any respiratory virus, no matter the variant.

What do coronavirus variants mean for your masks?

JaHu's picture

All but 5 GOP Senate members

All but 5 GOP Senate members vote to dismiss the Trump impeachment hearings. If it is dismissed, it only opens the door for more corruption in the executive branch and they are solely responsible for it. You can't blame future corruption on trump, fox news, the proud boys, or anyone else seeking to dismantle our democracy. They alone, have the power to end it. And it seems they are refusing to take the step forward to do it. Either out of fear of Trump and his followers or their own corruption.

jbr's picture

Covid-19 home test vending machine unveiled in New York City

vending machine that offers Covid-19 home test kits to the general public was unveiled at a Wellness 4 Humanity location in New York City on Jan. 26. The test costs $119 and provides a result in a day or two.

Covid-19 home test vending machine unveiled in New York City

JaHu's picture

Is Bill Lee as stupid as he

Is Bill Lee as stupid as he appears? He's actually lifting all restrictions on all sporting events from k-12 because covid numbers have dropped. Or is he just not happy because more people aren't catching the virus and dying?

bizgrrl's picture

Rhetorical question?

Rhetorical question?

JaHu's picture

Yes, unless there's an actual

Yes, unless there's an actual reasonable answer.

jbr's picture

Businesses, air filtering, ventilation and Covid-19

Do businesses get financial help for implementing air flow and filtration to help mitigate Covid-19?

Seems like every business should have that sort of thing. Particularly those that have large numbers of people packed in.

Consider using portable air cleaners to supplement increased HVAC system ventilation and filtration, especially in areas where adequate ventilation is difficult to achieve. Directing the airflow so that it does not blow directly from one person to another reduces the potential spread of droplets that may contain infectious viruses.

Air Cleaners, HVAC Filters, and Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Ventilation and Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Implementing a Layered Approach to Address COVID-19 in Public Indoor Spaces

R. Neal's picture

EPA Approves Emergency

EPA Approves Emergency Exemption for Antiviral Air Treatment

EPA is approving these emergency exemption requests from Georgia and Tennesse

Judging by the states requesting approval and the description of the technology, I'm only somewhat optimistic. But you never know.

jbr's picture

Map: Track the spread of the Covid-19 variants across the USA

There are 3 variants NBC News is tracking: The U.K., the South African and the Brazilian variants, each of which have been found in the country.

According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these variants spread more easily, and it’s unknown whether the illness caused is more severe. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was found to be only slightly less effective against the South African variant.

Map: Track the spread of the Covid-19 variants across the United States

jbr's picture

Congressman, vaccinated for Covid-19, tests positive for virus

Covid-19 vaccines prevent illness, but do not necessarily prevent infection. If someone tests positive and doesn't get sick, the vaccine has worked as intended. If someone tests positive within a few weeks of receiving the second dose, it may be because the vaccine hasn't yet fully kicked in.

Massachusetts Democratic congressman, vaccinated for Covid-19, tests positive for virus

bizgrrl's picture

"The US Centers for Disease

"The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says building immunity to Covid-19 "typically takes a few weeks" after vaccination."

Can you spread the coronavirus after you are vaccinated? How long after? I was under the impression you can transmit the coronavirus even weeks (or a long time) after being vaccinated. I don't know if it is true.

jbr's picture

From what I have read thus

From what I have read thus far that seems to still be unknown for certain. However ....

Simply put, the vaccine does not kill or destroy the virus if you are exposed. It simply trains your body to successfully fight off the virus so you do not get sick.

Goepfert says, with that being correct, it seems reasonable that a vaccinated person could continue to spread virus. This has ramifications for continued mask wearing and social distancing, even after large numbers of people have been vaccinated. Because of this, UAB medical experts advise that if your employer or institution offers sentinel testing, you should continue to participate after receiving the vaccine.

Can I still get COVID-19 after getting vaccinated?

JaHu's picture

This has been one of my major

This has been one of my major concerns about the vaccine. After a person gets vaccinated that they no longer feel the need to wear a mask. I wonder if at the vaccination sites they verbally, and in written form, tell the recipients that they must still wear a mask?

jbr's picture

I've had my Covid-19 vaccine -- now what can I safely do?

The day has finally come. You've received the second dose of a Covid-19 vaccine currently on the Western market -- Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech or Oxford-AstraZeneca.

Does that mean you're free to go about life as you did before the pandemic once immunity kicks in?

I've had my Covid-19 vaccine -- now what can I safely do? Your questions answered

jbr's picture

FAA's Zero Tolerance for Disruptive Passengers

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson has ordered the agency to take strong action against any passenger who disrupts or threatens the safety of a flight.

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson has ordered the agency to take strong action against any passenger who disrupts or threatens the safety of a flight.

jbr's picture

Adults age 70-plus can register for COVID-19 vaccination Tuesday

Those aged 70 to 74 have a 70% higher death rate and 40% higher hospitalization rate from the virus compared to those 65-69. This, cited by the Tennessee Department of Health as to why they’ve prioritized those in this age group due to their risk of illness and death.

Adults age 70-plus can register for COVID-19 vaccination Tuesday as state’s vaccine supply increases

JaHu's picture

South Carolina is already

South Carolina is already opening it up to people 65 and older.

bizgrrl's picture

I couldn't tell from the

I couldn't tell from the article whether all those in long-term care facilities actually got their vaccines. Seems there was a bit of confusion. Also, too bad there can't be a requirement for anyone working at a long-term care facility to have a coronavirus vaccine.

jbr's picture

Florida grocery store captures country’s divide over masks

A video taken at a market in Naples, Florida shows many customers and employees not wearing masks. Experts say wearing masks can slow the spread of Covid-19.

Florida grocery store captures country’s divide over wearing masks

jbr's picture

Biden administration weighs plan to directly send masks

That seems a waste of time and money to me. It is so easy to get a mask now, I don't see the point. Unless you are sending everyone can N95 mask. Or an equivalent.

Biden administration weighs plan to directly send masks to all Americans

jbr's picture

Morristown asks people not to litter as roadside trash piles up

City officials in Morristown are asking people not to litter. They said that roadside litter has been a growing problem, partly due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

They said that crews from the county jail and area volunteers usually help gather litter along the roads. However, those groups have not been able to meet and clean up the roads because of COVID-19. As a result, the litter has been piling up.

Morristown asks people not to litter as roadside trash piles up, inmate crews unable to gather it

Treehouse's picture

Ooh, good idea!

Let's ask people not to litter anywhere!

jbr's picture

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine

Preliminary data from a small study suggested that the AstraZeneca vaccine offers only "minimal protection against mild-moderate disease" caused by the variant in South Africa. The variant appears to be more infectious, and it is driving a deadly resurgence of the disease in the country, accounting for more than 90 percent of the Covid-19 cases, Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said Sunday night.

"The AstraZeneca vaccine appeared effective against the original strain but not against the variant," Mkhize said. "We have decided to put a temporary hold on the rollout of the vaccine. ... More work needs to be done."

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine after study questions effectiveness against variant

jbr's picture

GOP Rep. Ron Wright dies following Covid diagnosis

"Congressman Ron Wright passed away peacefully at the age of 67 on Feb. 7, 2021. His wife Susan was by his side and he is now in the presence of their Lord and Savior," the statement read. "For the previous two weeks, Ron and Susan had been admitted to Baylor Hospital in Dallas after contracting COVID-19."

GOP Rep. Ron Wright dies following Covid diagnosis

jbr's picture

Knoxville bars cited by Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission

Paul's Oasis and Billiards and Brews are both cited by the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission for failure to comply with city rules regarding curfew.

Two Knoxville bars cited by Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission

jbr's picture

How billions in pandemic aid was swindled by con artists

Many identity theft victims may have no idea that benefits were filed in their name. But in recent weeks, millions of Americans began receiving 1099 tax forms from the IRS for benefits they never got.

Michael Webb, a 41-year-old former business owner from Lexington, Kentucky, was dumbfounded when he received a 1099 that showed $13,000 in benefits was filed in his name.

Webb had filed for unemployment benefits in March — and followed up repeatedly since then — but never got his claim approved. He now suspects it may have been because someone had already made a claim using his personal information.

How billions in pandemic aid was swindled by con artists and crime syndicates

JaHu's picture

Republicans are saying it's

Republicans are saying it's unconstitutional to impeach a former president. North Carolina Republican Senator Burr was just censured by his party in his State for voting for impeachment. From what I've read of the constitution they may be right but only in a normal situation. My question is? The House voted to impeach Trump before Biden took office, right? Wouldn't that constitute that it was still an ongoing impeachment process therefore it was still an open case? Both, the House and Senate are both bodies of Congress so wouldn't it mean it was still an open case? They were not impeaching Trump for what he did after he left office. It was for the things he did while he was in office. Like for instance. If a trial starts before the statute of limitations expires in a case, isn't it still considered an open case even if the SOL is reached during the trial? Can anyone here clarify this for me? Wouldn't that still mean trump could've been impeached?

Also this would mean Senator Burr was wrongfully censured.

jbr's picture

Covid and creativity

jbr's picture

DeSantis defends controversial vaccine deal with developer

Florida's Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis has threatened to move a pop-up vaccination clinic that his state has set up in an affluent community in Manatee County after he was confronted with allegations of political favoritism and preference for the wealthy at a news conference Wednesday.

The vaccines, however, would be limited to people living in only two zip codes -- 34202 and 34211.

DeSantis defends controversial vaccine deal with developer -- and threatens to pull vaccines if officials don't like it

jbr's picture

Florida commissioner apologizes for making vaccine ‘VIP’ list

I think she means "I am sorry I got caught"

Emails also show Baugh created a “VIP” list for the vaccine and asked Public Safety Director Jacob Saur to ensure she and four others could get vaccinated at the clinic.

Florida commissioner apologizes for making vaccine ‘VIP’ list, adding her name to it

jbr's picture

Covid-19 cuts U.S. life expectancy by a year

Life expectancy in the United States fell by an entire year in the first half of 2020 as Covid-19 swept through the country, health data published on Thursday found, a decline not seen since World War II

Covid-19 cuts U.S. life expectancy by a year in first half of 2020, biggest drop since WWII

jbr's picture

Two women dressed as 'grannies' tried to get Covid-19 vaccine

Two women were caught trying to get second doses of the Covid-19 vaccine by dressing up as "grannies." They came to the vaccination site wearing bonnets, gloves, and glasses.

Two women dressed as 'grannies' tried to get Covid-19 vaccine

jbr's picture

Pulse oximeter and skin pigmentation

In the fight against Covid-19, the pulse oximeter has been an essential tool for doctors and other medical professionals. But the small device that monitors oxygen levels may not work well for people with dark skin, according to multiple studies and government health agencies.

Earlier in week, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also updated its coronavirus clinical guidance to warn doctors and nurses that data from several studies suggest skin pigmentation can affect the accuracy of the devices.

This device is crucial in the fight against Covid. It may not work on dark skin

CDC: Interim Clinical Guidance for Management of Patients with Confirmed Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

JaHu's picture

Thousands of dollars for

Thousands of dollars for electric bills in Texas. They obviously didn't learn the lesson of the downside of privatizing electric companies from California's Enron.

JaHu's picture

Randy, you should consider

Randy, you should consider adding a button on this thread that takes you to the top. And one that takes you to the bottom of this thread. :)

jbr's picture

Pharmacists say 'pooling' Covid vaccines could save doses

Even though pooling is common, the FDA says pharmacists and other clinicians cannot pool leftover Covid-19 vaccine because neither Moderna's nor Pfizer's products contain preservatives, which help stop microbial growth in case the vaccine is contaminated with bacteria or other germs.

Pharmacists say 'pooling' Covid vaccines could save thousands of doses

jbr's picture

Tracking Covid-19 vaccinations worldwide

Chili numbers are interesting

Tracking Covid-19 vaccinations worldwide

jbr's picture

Going maskless is a key factor in Covid-19 outbreaks at gyms

About two days before experiencing symptoms, the fitness instructor led a yoga class for 27 people while wearing a mask. There were no reported cases among these participants.

A few hours before symptom onset, the same instructor led a stationary cycling class for 10 people, none of whom wore a mask. All participants later tested positive for Covid-19, including a second fitness instructor linked to additional cases.

Going maskless is a key factor in Covid-19 outbreaks at gyms, studies say

jbr's picture

Third Pfizer dose? The Covid-19 vaccine maker studying booster

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said the hope is that a third dose will boost the immune response even higher, offering better protection against variants.

That's not unlike how the flu shot changes from year to year, accounting for the strains most likely to infect people.

A third Pfizer dose? The Covid-19 vaccine maker is studying booster shots.

jbr's picture

Open a window to reduce virus spread, CDC tells schools

"If you look at all the high profile outbreaks -- same underlying factors -- no masks, low ventilation. It doesn't matter if it's spin class, ice hockey, camps, classrooms, choir practice or restaurants, (it's) the same underlying factors," Joseph Allen, who directs the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told CNN earlier this month.

Open a window to reduce virus spread, CDC tells schools

How to use CDC building recommendations in your setting

jbr's picture

Alabama governor extends mask order ...

Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has expressed concern about states rolling back coronavirus mandates.

"Please hear me clearly," she said at a White House Covid-19 briefing this week, "At this level of cases with variants spreading, we stand to completely lose the hard-earned ground we have gained."

Alabama governor extends mask order but says mandate will end in April

jbr's picture

Children's hospitals see surge in rare Covid-19 complication

Talking it over with her dad, he reminded her a friend's child had a "weird syndrome" called MIS-C that stands for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children.

Some children's hospitals see a surge in rare Covid-19 complication MIS-C

jbr's picture

CDC updates its Covid-19 guidance for childcare programs

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday updated its guidance for childcare programs during the pandemic, emphasizing the importance of mask-wearing for everyone 2 years of age and older, as well as air ventilation and other strategies.

CDC updates its Covid-19 guidance for childcare programs

CDC: Ventilation in Schools and Childcare Programs

jbr's picture

The passenger refused to wear mask

The passenger refused to wear a mask, kept drinking alcohol he'd brought on board and was so disruptive the plane was turned around, the FAA said.

Passenger's boozing, mask refusal, bad behavior on flight could cost him $14,500

jbr's picture

Ireland halts use of AstraZeneca vaccine

The Irish National Immunization Advisory Committee (NIAC) made the directive as a precaution though it "has not been concluded that there is any link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and these cases," it said in a statement.

Ireland halts use of AstraZeneca vaccine following blood clot reports in Norway

jbr's picture

Vaccine holdouts could be last obstacle to defeating pandemic

Last week, a Monmouth University poll found that 56 percent of Republicans either wanted to wait and see further before getting a vaccine or said they will likely never get one, compared to just 23 percent of Democrats. Another poll, from NPR/PBS/Marist, found that 47 percent of Trump voters and 41 percent of Republicans said they will not get the vaccine when made available to them. And a Kaiser Family Foundation tracking poll found the number of Republicans refusing to get the vaccine was 28 percent, while the number of Black Americans and Hispanic Americans who felt that stood at 14 percent and 12 percent respectively.

Together, those groups could leave around a quarter or more of the American population unvaccinated, while scientists now estimate herd immunity will only be reached when 70 to 85 percent of the population carry the virus's antibodies.

How Biden, Republicans and public health leaders are trying to persuade GOP skeptics to get their Covid vaccinations

jbr's picture

Duke students on Covid-19 lockdown

Administrators at Duke University ordered all undergraduate students to stay in place for one week to contain a growing coronavirus outbreak connected to "recruitment parties for selective living groups," according to an all-campus communication.

Duke students on Covid-19 lockdown for a week due to 'rapidly escalating' outbreak

jbr's picture

Covid antibodies in ~1 in 5 blood donations of unvaccinated

In the first week of March, more than 20% of blood donations from unvaccinated people had Covid-19 antibodies, according to data shared with CNN by the American Red Cross.

Covid-19 antibodies present in about 1 in 5 blood donations from unvaccinated people, according to data from the American Red Cross

jbr's picture

Variant is about to become dominant in the US

The safety measures will be especially crucial now that multiple variants of the virus are circulating -- including the highly contagious B.1.1.7 variant that was first identified in the UK.

It's projected to become the dominant variant in the US by the end of this month or early April, Walensky said Monday.

A concerning variant is about to become dominant in the US, experts say, and how Americans act could help fuel or curb a surge

jbr's picture

CNN reporter asks entire restaurant about vaccine

CNN's Gary Tuchman talks to residents in Boise City, Oklahoma, on their hesitancy to take the coronavirus vaccine

CNN reporter asks entire restaurant about vaccine. See their response

bizgrrl's picture

Well, i'll be. Hope they

Well, i'll be. Hope they don't travel.

jbr's picture

I wonder what they think

I wonder what they think about the polio vaccine

jbr's picture

See Rand Paul spar with Dr. Fauci over masks

Republican senator from Kentucky Rand Paul challenged Dr. Fauci on why Americans should wear masks after being vaccinated during a Senate hearing. Dr. Fauci responded that wearing masks after vaccination would be a good practice considering the unknown potential of Covid-19 variants spreading in communities.

See Rand Paul spar with Dr. Fauci over masks

jbr's picture

Restaurant manager stabbed by customer who refused to wear mask

Police are looking for a man who allegedly stabbed a restaurant manager multiple times after he was told to wear a mask inside a Jack in the Box restaurant in League City, Texas.

Jack in the Box restaurant manager stabbed by customer who refused to wear a mask, police say

jbr's picture

Florida reaches 2 million infections

bizgrrl's picture

Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber

Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber declared a state of emergency and set a curfew Saturday, saying the crowds that have descended on the city recently are "more than we can handle."
...
The 8 p.m. curfew and road closures in the city's entertainment district will be in effect for the next 72 hours, Gelber said at a news conference Saturday.
The causeways to Miami Beach from the mainland will be closed to non-local traffic starting at 9 p.m. for the next few nights, Gelber said.
,,,
On Friday night, someone shot a weapon into the air, and there was a riot, he said.
...
Since February 3, officers have made more than 900 arrests in the city, "more than 300 of which were for felony offenses," the summary said. "At least 50% off those arrested reside outside of Florida."

jbr's picture

Hundreds of people defy Miami Beach curfew orders

jbr's picture

Brazil sees record-breaking coronavirus deaths

jbr's picture

Miami Heat redefines VIP: vaccinated important people

Starting April 1, fans with proof from federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that they got their last shot at least 14 days prior to the game will be allowed to enter the arena through a separate gate, given “vaccine verified” wristbands and directed to these primo seats.

Miami Heat redefines VIP in Covid era: vaccinated important people

jbr's picture

Brazil Covid spirals out of control

Brazil has recorded roughly 24% of all coronavirus deaths worldwide over the past two weeks, according to JHU data.

Signs of collapse across Brazil as Covid spirals out of control. Bolsonaro seems to have little response

jbr's picture

Some US states report concerning Covid-19 case increases

After weeks of declines and then a plateau, the average number of new Covid-19 cases saw a 7% increase from the previous week, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said on Friday. The average of new virus-related hospitalizations also saw a slight increase from the previous week, she said.

Some US states report concerning Covid-19 case increases -- and one warns the surge is already here

jbr's picture

Pfizer says Covid-19 vaccine protection lasts at least six month

The ongoing Phase 3 clinical trial of Pfizer/BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine confirms its protection lasts at least six months after the second dose, the companies said Thursday.

Pfizer says Covid-19 vaccine protection lasts at least six months, protects against variants

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Nursing homes see 96% decline in new cases

Since vaccines started rolling out in December, nursing homes saw a 96% decline in new Covid-19 cases, according to an analysis from the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL).

More than 11,000 cases of a troubling variant reported in the US. These states have the highest numbers

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Get fully vaccinated before resuming normal activities

"We need to hold out just a bit longer and give vaccines a chance to really get the upper hand in this," Fauci said. "I'll guarantee as we get into the late spring and the early summer, you're going to see a return to gradual degree of normality that everyone is hoping for, but we don't want to do it prematurely."

More than 30.5 million people in the US have been infected with coronavirus and 553,120 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Get fully vaccinated before resuming normal activities, health experts plead with Americans

fischbobber's picture

For the time being.........

It's all over but the shouting. Expect an uptick in cases, followed by an uptick in hospitalizations and a death spike. We are at a hard to predict phase of this pandemic. Even at a worst case scenario, I don't think it will be as bad as Nov.-Jan. I would look for pocket outbreaks for quite some time. Anti-vaxxers and anti-maskers tend to run in the same circles and they like meetings. I hate meetings.

This death spike is scheduled for the weekend after Mother's Day. The Valentine's Day spike included 4 45-64 year olds. It concerns me that accelerating the spread downwards through age groups will lead to unnecessary disability and death in our young and pediatric categories. I still think masking is appropriate, needed, and necessary. Be careful out there.

Wear a mask, get vaccinated and lay low while this surge runs its course.Hope it's a molehill.

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CDC: Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility

The virus that causes COVID-19 can land on surfaces. It’s possible for people to become infected if they touch those surfaces and then touch their nose, mouth, or eyes. In most situations, the risk of infection from touching a surface is low. The most reliable way to prevent infection from surfaces is to regularly wash hands or use hand sanitizer.

CDC: Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility

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Bar opening event in rural Illinois linked to 46 Covid-19 cases

A bar opening event in rural Illinois in February was linked to 46 Covid-19 cases, a school closure affecting 650 children, and the hospitalization of one long-term care facility resident, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on Monday.

Bar opening event in rural Illinois linked to 46 Covid-19 cases and a school closure, CDC report finds

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Powell tells '60 Minutes' US economy is at 'inflection point"

"The principal risk to our economy right now really is that the disease would spread again. It's going to be smart if people can continue to socially distance and wear masks," he told "60 Minutes."

Powell tells '60 Minutes' that US economy is at an 'inflection point'

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States see rise in unused vaccines as demand flattens

At their peaks, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Arkansas and Tennessee used less than 85 percent of their doses, and as of April 15 they’ve used less than 70 percent, the lowest in the nation.

States see rise in unused vaccines as demand flattens, shifting focus to hesitancy

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Should we still wear masks outside?

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CDC:COVID-19 Recommended Ventilation in Buildings

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Family allegedly sold bottles of bleach marketed as Covid cure

Some more "What is wrong with people" ...

A Florida father and his three sons were accused in federal court of selling tens of thousands of bottles of bleach that were marketed as a “miracle cure” for coronavirus and other illnesses, authorities said Friday.

Florida family allegedly sold thousands of bottles of bleach marketed as Covid cure

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Colleges and vaccines

While some US colleges and universities are requiring students to get the coronavirus vaccine, others are still hesitant, fearing legal consequences.

Colleges and vaccine

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Reinbold, a coronavirus

Reinbold, a coronavirus vaccine skeptic, has frequently clashed with airline employees over mask requirements.

Alaska Airlines bans state lawmaker for her 'continued refusal to comply' with mask mandate

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West Virginia offers savings bonds to people who get vaccinated

West Virginians between the ages of 16 and 35 who get the Covid-19 vaccine will receive a $100 savings bond, the state's governor announced Monday.

Justice said the goal is to get more than 70 percent of West Virginia's eligible population vaccinated, which would be doable if 80 percent of the population between the ages of 16 and 35 got the shots.

West Virginia offers $100 savings bonds to people 16 to 35 who get vaccinated

bizgrrl's picture

Pretty cool.

Pretty cool.

jbr's picture

Six-foot social distancing rule misses bigger risks, MIT experts

While staying six feet apart can help prevent the spread of large droplets of saliva or mucus that carry coronavirus and other germs, that distance does nothing to protect people from tiny airborne particles of virus called aerosols, MIT engineer Martin Bazant and mathematician John Bush write in a report published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Six-foot social distancing rule misses bigger risks, MIT experts say

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